Sale!

Comparative Cognition 1st Edition Olmstead Kuhlmeier Instructors Manual

$80.00 $12.99

Comparative Cognition 1st Edition Olmstead Kuhlmeier Instructors Manual

ISBN-13: 978-1107011168

ISBN-10: 1107011167

 

Description

Comparative Cognition 1st Edition Olmstead Kuhlmeier Instructors Manual

ISBN-13: 978-1107011168

ISBN-10: 1107011167

 

 

 

Be the best nurse you can be:

Nursing test banks are legit and very helpful. This test bank on this page can be downloaded immediately after you checkout today.

Here is the definition of nursing

Its true that you will receive the entire legit test bank for this book and it can happen today regardless if its day or night. We have made the process automatic for you so that you don’t have to wait.

We encourage you to purchase from only a trustworthy provider:

Our site is one of the most confidential websites on the internet. We maintain no logs and guarantee it. Our website is also encrypted with an SSL on the entire website which will show on your browser with a lock symbol. This means not a single person can view any information.

, if you prefer a digital instead of a hardcover.

Have any comments or suggestions?

When you get your file today you will be able to open it on your device and start studying for your class right now.

Free Nursing Test Questions:

Chapter 4

1. In a study cited in the opening of Chapter 4, carrion crows approached and
explored mussel shells, which they initially ignored, after serendipitously and
repeatedly finding small pieces of beef under the shells. Identify the US, UR, CS, and
CR in this example.

a)
Shells, ignoring of shells, shells with beef underneath, exploration of

shells.
b)  Beef, ignoring of shells, shells, and increased exploration of shells.
c)  Beef, exploration of shells, shells, increased exploration of shells.
d)
Shells with beef underneath, exploration of shells, shells, increased

exploration of shells.

2. Which of the following experimental paradigms is not used in research on
classical conditioning?

a)  Sensory preconditioning.
b)  Devaluation.
c)  Conditioned place preference.
d)  What‐where‐when task.

3. What does a suppression ratio of 0.42 indicate?

a)
No conditioning.
b)  Weak conditioning.
c)  Conditioning at some times but not others.
d)  Maximal conditioning.

4. Which of the following describes a fixed interval (FI) 10‐s schedule of
reinforcement?

a)  Reinforcement is presented every 10 seconds.
b)  Reinforcement is presented, on average, every 10 seconds.
c)  Reinforcement is presented every 10 seconds if a response is

made.
d)  Reinforcement is presented 10 seconds after the last reinforcer.

Instructor’s Manual for Comparative Cognition: Multiple Choice Questions pg. 24

5. If you wanted to induce high rates of responding with few breaks, which
reinforcement schedule would you use?

a)  Low fixed ratio schedule.
b)  Low variable ratio schedule.
c)
High fixed ratio schedule.
d)  High variable ratio schedule.

6. Garcia and Koelling (1966) presented rats with a drinking tube containing
flavoured water and every time the rats licked the tube, they were presented with a
flash of light and a clicking sound; subsequently, half of the rats were given an
electric shock and half received an x‐ray treatment that made them sick. What did
the researchers find during testing and how did they explain the results?

a)  Rats that were x‐rayed preferred the plain water and avoided the
flavoured water due to adaptive specialization.
b)  Both groups of rats preferred the plain water and avoided the
flavoured water due to blocking.
c)
Rats that were x‐rayed preferred the flavoured water and avoided the
plain water due to overshadowing.
d)  Both groups of rats preferred the plain water and avoided the
flavoured water due to conditioned taste aversion.

7. Which of the following describes disinhibition?

a)
In the absence of the US, the CR reappears after a delay period even in
the absence of the US.
b)
In the absence of the US, the CR reappears when the CS is
presented with a novel stimulus.
c)
In the absence of the  US in another context, the CR reappears when
the CS is presented in the original context
d)
In the absence of the US, the CR is slow to appear following CS

preexposure.

8. Which of the following are not principle components of the Associative Cybernetic
model?

a)
A system that represents S‐R learning.
b)
A system that represents R‐O associations.
c)  A system that represents S‐S associations.
d)
A system that represents the value of O.
9. Which of the following findings support the idea of homology?

a)
Classical and operant conditioning are mediated through dissociable
brain structures in mammals.
b)  Genetically modified flies fail to be classically conditioned even
though they show no deficit in operant conditioning.
c)  Molecular mechanisms of classical conditioning resemble the
molecular mechanisms of memory.
d)    The same brain regions are involved in conditioned reflexive
responses (e.g., conditioned eyeblink response) in various
species.

10. In one experiment, rats were presented with a tone, followed by a shock. After
they were conditioned to freeze to the tone in the absence of the shock, they were
presented with a compound stimulus consisting of a tone and a light, followed by a
shock. A control group of rats were also presented with this compound stimulus and
the shock. At test, only the rats in the control group showed conditioning to the light
alone. What does this finding illustrate?

a)  Latent inhibition.
b)  Blocking.
c)  Overshadowing.
d)
Disinhibition.

11. Thorndike’s ‘law of effect’ refers to

a)
a short‐hand for the second law of thermodynamics.
b)  a change in behavior based on its consequence.
c)
an unconditioned stimulus that is always followed by an

unconditioned response.
d)
learning that will always result in consolidation.

12. Many children have an unlearned fear of the dark, but it is difficult to teach
children to fear cars, a more real and immediate threat. This is an example of

a)  adaptive specialization.
b)
fear conditioning.
c)
sensory preconditioning.
d)  preparatory responses.
13. Presenting the CS alone prior to any CS‐US pairing, is an example of ______ and
________ the predictive value of the CS.

a)
latent inhibition; increases.
b)
blocking; decreases.
c)
latent inhibition; decreases.
d)
blocking; increases.

14. Which of the following statements about extinction is FALSE?

a)  During extinction, the conditioned response is gradually reduced.
b)  Extinction may not occur if an animal experiences the CS alone in a

new context.
c)  After extinction occurs, repeated US‐CS pairings will reestablish

the CR.
d)
In disinhibition, a novel stimulus can disrupt extinction.

15. Which of the following statements about extinction is FALSE?

a)  During extinction, the unconditioned response is gradually

reduced.
b)  Extinction may not occur if an animal experiences the CS alone in a

new context.
c)
After extinction occurs, repeated CS‐US pairings will reestablish the

CR.
d)
In disinhibition, a novel stimulus can disrupt extinction.

16. Latent inhibition poses a problem for the Rescorla‐Wagner model of classical
conditioning because

a)
there is nothing surprising about a CS that is not paired with a US.
b)  pre‐exposure to a CS should block subsequent conditioning to this

stimulus.
c)  during pre‐exposure, the error term is negative so no conditioning

occurs.
d)
it can not explain how stimuli lose associative strength during

pre‐exposure.

17. When Pavlov was conducting his studies of classical conditioning, he noticed
that dogs developed conditioned salivary responses more rapidly to novel stimuli.
This observations fits with the phenomenon of

a)   sensory preconditioning.
b)   blocking.
c)   latent inhibition.
d)   overshadowing.

 

 

18. Using the mathematical equation defined by the Rescorla‐Wagner model of
classical conditioning, calculate the associative strength of CSA on the first 4
conditioning trials using the following values:

i.  The maximum amount of strength that the US can support = 200

ii.  The learning rate parameter defined by the salience of the CS = .3

iii.  The learning rate parameter defined by the salience of the US = 1

a)
0, 30, 230, 600
b)
0, 60, 102, 131.4
c)
60, 102, 131.4, 151.98
d)
60, 42, 29.4, 20.58

19. If a suppression ratio changes from 0.5 to 0.25 over trials, it indicates that

a)  animals have developed a conditioned approach response to the lever.
b)
the learning rate has been cut in half.
c)
the learning rate has doubled.
d)  conditioned fear has developed.

20. A food‐restricted rat was required to lever press, on average, 50 times before it
received a food pellet. This is an example of which type of free operant
reinforcement schedule:

a)
fixed ratio schedule: 50.
b)  variable ratio schedule: 50
c)
fixed interval schedule: 50
d)
variable interval schedule: 50

21. An organism performs a novel behavioral response that is immediately followed
by the presentation of a highly valued appetitive stimulus.  Very rapidly, the
organism is performing the behavioral response at a frequency of 100 responses per
minute.  The same reinforcer is presented, on average, every 20 seconds.  The
organism has clearly developed an erroneous belief that the presentation of the
reinforcer depends on this high rate of responding because the reinforcer is
presented non‐contingently.  How would you describe this behavior?

a)  Conditioned reinforcement.
b)
Fixed interval responding.
c)  Superstition.
d)  Devaluation.
22. Which of the following is NOT part of the Associative Cybernetic model of
operant conditioning?

a)  Drive System.
b)  Motor System.
c)  Habit System.
d)  Associative System.

23. What is the primary difference between classical and operant conditioning?

a)
Classical conditioning depends on the animal’s behavior, operant

conditioning   does not.
b)   Stimulus salience affects operant, but not classical, conditioning.
c)   Operant conditioning depends on the animal’s behavior; classical

conditioning does not.
d)   Stimulus salience affects classical, but not operant, conditioning.

24. Schedules of reinforcement induce different patterns of responding, suggesting
that

a)   animals have some knowledge of the payoffs provided by each

schedule.
b)   animals are oblivious to the schedules of reinforcement.
c)   animals will always respond most on a fixed interval schedule of

reinforcement.
d)   animals will always respond most on a variable interval schedule of

reinforcement.

25. Classical conditioning of the eyeblink response

a)    produces excitatory circuits within the cerebellum.
b)    elicits increased neurotransmitter release from the inferior olive

nucleus.
c)
is mediated by the convergence of CS and US signals within the
interpositus nucleus.
d)    depends on differential activation of CS

signals.
26. The firing rate of midbrain dopamine neurons increases when animals are
presented with an unexpected reward and decrease when an expected reward is
omitted.  This suggests that these neurons are coding one aspect of the Resorla‐
Wagner model?

a)  ΔV.
b)  α.
c)  β.
d)  λ ‐ SV.

27. Based on what we know about the neural mechanisms of classical conditioning,
we would expect that Pavlov’s dogs would show

a)
increased cell firing in the cerebellum.
b)
increased PKC signaling in some neurons.
c)
decreased 5‐HT release in some neurons.
d)
increased cAMP signaling in some neurons.

28. If it is true that different brain regions control S‐R and R‐O associations in
operant conditioning, we can infer that

a)  operant conditioning is governed entirely by associative learning.
b)
classical and operant conditioning are mediated through distinct

systems.
c)  habitual and goal‐directed behaviors are dissociable.
d)
goal‐directed behaviors are an example of classical conditioning.

29. What would be the best evidence that classical conditioning is conserved across
evolution?

a)  The same biological mechanism mediates the process in different

species.
b)
Classical conditioning is observed in virtually every species studied.
c)  The ability to predict motivationally significant events confers a

survival
advantage to all species.
d)  Different species have converged on the same cognitive solution to

problems in their environment.

30. How does the Rescorla Wagner model account for adaptive specializations?

a)
The value of α  reflects the biological significance of the CS.
b)  The value of β  reflects the biological significance of the US.
c)
The value of λ  reflects the biological significance of the US.
d)  No aspect of the model accounts for adaptive specializations.
31. How do midbrain dopamine neurons respond to reward presentation?

a)   Neurons fire more rapidly when an unexpected reward is
received.
b)
The firing rate does not change when an expected reward is received.
c)
The firing rate declines when an expected reward is not received.
d)   Neurons fire more rapidly when an expected reward is received.

32. Which of the following is not true about the neural mechanisms of associative
learning?

a)   Operant and classical conditioning are mediated by different brain

regions.
b)   The same intracellular changes are able to explain all instances

of associative learning.
c)  S‐R relationships involve the dorsal striatum.
d)   R‐O relationships involve signals sent from the prefrontal cortex.

33. Experiments examining the cellular mechanisms of classical conditioning in
aplysia use a touch to two different parts of the body as the CS+ (followed by US)
and CS‐ (not followed by US).  Why is it necessary to counterbalance the two CSs by
switching which touch serves as the CS+ and which serves as the CS‐ in different
groups of animals?

a)  To ensure that sensitized responding does not explain the

behavioral changes.
b)
A touch to the tail does not release 5‐HT.
c)  Certain CSs will not form associations with certain USs.
d)
Switching the CS produces better conditioning.

34. What is another term for ‘Omission training’?

a)   Positive reinforcement.
b)   Negative reinforcement.
c)   Positive punishment.
d)   Negative punishment.

35. Which of the following is not a common physiological measure of conditioned
fear  responses?

a)  Galvanic skin response.
b)   Blood pressure.
c)   Pupil dilation/constriction.
d)   Myocardial infarction.
36. A tone and light are paired 30 times.  The tone alone is then paired with an
electric foot shock 10 times.  What would you expect to result from this paradigm?

a)
The tone, but not the light, will elicit freezing.
b)
The light, but not the tone, will elicit freezing.
c)  Both the tone and the light will elicit freezing.
d)
The light will elicit freezing, but only after a second session of tone‐

light pairing.

37. A rat in a skinner box is rewarded for the first lever press that occurs 40 seconds
after the previous lever press.  Lever pressing before the end of this 40‐second wait‐
period goes unrewarded.  What type of reinforcement schedule does this describe?

a)  Variable interval.
b)  Fixed interval.
c)  Fixed time.
d)  All of the above.