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Biopsychology 9th Edition Pinel Test Bank

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Biopsychology 9th Edition Pinel Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-0205915576

ISBN-10: 0205915574

 

 

Description

Biopsychology 9th Edition Pinel Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-0205915576

ISBN-10: 0205915574

 

 

 

 

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Free Nursing Test Questions:

 

Chapter 7

Mechanisms of Perception: Hearing, Touch, Smell, Taste, and Attention:

How You Know the World

 

Multiple Choice Questions

 

1)  Areas of neocortex that receive most of their input from the thalamic relay nuclei of one sensory system are classified as

  1. A) association cortex.
  2. B) tertiary cortex.
  3. C) motor cortex.
  4. D) secondary sensory cortex.
  5. E) primary sensory cortex.

Answer: E

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 162

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: This is true by definition.

 

2)  An area of cerebral cortex that receives substantial input from more than one sensory system is classified as

  1. A) hierarchical cortex.
  2. B) primary sensory cortex.
  3. C) secondary sensory cortex.
  4. D) association cortex.
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 162

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: This is true by definition.

 

3)  A hierarchical system is one in which

  1. A) there is one absolute top.
  2. B) there is one absolute bottom.
  3. C) each element has specific levels or ranks with respect to one another.
  4. D) no two elements are at the same level.
  5. E) there is no cortical involvement.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 163

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: A and B may be partially true, but C is the best answer to the question.

 

4)  The simple process of detecting the presence of stimuli is often referred to as

  1. A) seeing.
  2. B) hearing.
  3. C) sensation.
  4. D) perception.
  5. E) attention.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 163

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: This is true by historical definition.

 

5)  Each cortical level of a sensory system (primary, secondary, or association) is itself composed of different areas that mediate different psychological processes. This principle of sensory system organization is referred to as A) functional segregation.

  1. B) parallel processing.
  2. C) the binding problem.
  3. D) hierarchical organization.
  4. E) serial processing.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 163

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: This is true by definition.

 

6)  A major principle of sensory system organization is

  1. A) hierarchical organization.
  2. B) functional segregation.
  3. C) parallel processing.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 163

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: All three principles are emphasized in the text.

 

7)  A system in which information is conducted in a single route through its various components – like a string through beads – is called a

  1. A) parallel system.
  2. B) functional system.
  3. C) hierarchical system.
  4. D) serial system.
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 164

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: This is a key principle because it is a common way of thinking about neural systems that is totally incompatible with modern parallel-systems approach.

 

8)  Modern neuroscientific theory considers sensory systems to be

  1. A) analog, parallel, and general.
  2. B) functionally segregated, serial, and parallel.
  3. C) hierarchical, functionally segregated, and parallel.
  4. D) functionally segregated, serial, and sequential.
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 164

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: The chapter is based on this three-part concept.

 

9)  Because sensory systems are characterized by functional segregation while perception is largely holistic, there is a

  1. A) binding problem.
  2. B) need for feedback circuits.
  3. C) flaw in serial coding.
  4. D) flaw in parallel coding.
  5. E) segregation problem.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 164

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

Rationale: The binding problem is discussed in the text and is a classic problem of cognitive psychology.

 

10)  For humansRemember,unds are those molecular vibrations between about __________ hertz.

  1. A) 20 and 200
  2. B) 2,000 and 20,000
  3. C) 200 and 2,000
  4. D) 200 and 8,000
  5. E) 20 and 20,000

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 165

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

11)  The loudness, pitch, and timbre of a sound are directly related to the __________, respectively, of the vibrations that produced it.

  1. A) frequency, amplitude, and complexity
  2. B) amplitude, complexity, and frequency
  3. C) amplitude, frequency, and complexity
  4. D) complexity, frequency, and amplitude
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 165

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

12)  The frequency of sound waves is to the complexity of sound waves as the

  1. A) pitch of sound is to the timbre.
  2. B) amplitude of sound is to the loudness.
  3. C) pitch of sound is to the amplitude.
  4. D) timbre of sound is to the loudness.
  5. E) loudness of sound is to the timbre.

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 165

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

13)  Which ossicle is attached to the round window?

  1. A) malleus
  2. B) incus
  3. C) hammer
  4. D) both A and C
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 165

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

Rationale: E is correct because the ossicles are attached to the tympanic membrane and oval window.

 

14)  The malleus, incus, and stapes

  1. A) are small bones that transmit vibrations from the ear drum to the oval window.
  2. B) are small bones that transmit vibrations from the oval window to the round window.
  3. C) were the three ships of Christopher Columbus.
  4. D) are small bones in the inner ear.
  5. E) both B and D

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 165

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

15)  Which of the following auditory structures has the appearance of a snail and has a name that is derived from the Greek word for land snail?

  1. A) ossicles
  2. B) cochlea
  3. C) malleus
  4. D) tectorial membrane
  5. E) olive

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 166

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

16)  Resting on the auditory hair cells is the

  1. A) cochlea.
  2. B) basilar membrane.
  3. C) organ of Corti.
  4. D) tectorial membrane.
  5. E) auditory nerve. Answer: D

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 168

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

17)  Which of the following is part of the organ of Corti?

  1. A) the semicircular canals
  2. B) the hair cells
  3. C) the basilar membrane
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both B and C

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 166

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

Rationale: The semicircular canals are part of the vestibular system.

 

18)  The auditory system is organized

  1. A) retinotopically.
  2. B) geographically.
  3. C) tonotopically.
  4. D) somatotopically.
  5. E) volumetrically.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

19)  The visual system is to retinotopic as the auditory system is to

  1. A) homotopic.
  2. B) spatiotopic.
  3. C) intensity topic.
  4. D) tonotopic.
  5. E) timbre topic.

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

20)  Which of the following contains the receptors of the vestibular system?

  1. A) the basilar membrane
  2. B) the semicircular canals
  3. C) the ossicles
  4. D) the vestibular nucleus
  5. E) the cochlea

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

Rationale: The vestibular nucleus contains no receptors: D is incorrect.

 

 

21)  The sensory organs of the vestibular system

  1. A) maintain balance.
  2. B) activate one branch of cranial nerve VIII.
  3. C) are the semicircular canals.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: D

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

22)  The semicircular canals are the receptive organs of

  1. A) the auditory system.
  2. B) the vestibular system.
  3. C) a top-down sensory system.
  4. D) an exteroceptive system.
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

23)  The axons of the auditory nerves synapse in the ipsilateral

  1. A) cochlear nuclei.
  2. B) superior olivary nuclei.
  3. C) medial geniculate nuclei.
  4. D) inferior colliculi.
  5. E) lateral lemniscus.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

24)  The superior olives receive much of their neural input from the

  1. A) medial geniculate nuclei.
  2. B) superior colliculus.
  3. C) inferior colliculus.
  4. D) cochlear nuclei.
  5. E) lateral geniculate nuclei.

Answer: D

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

25)  The major auditory projections of the inferior colliculi go to the

  1. A) cochlear nuclei.
  2. B) medial geniculate nuclei.
  3. C) lateral geniculate nuclei.
  4. D) superior olives.
  5. E) auditory nerve.

Answer: B

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

26)  Exceptions to the usual tonotopic organization of the auditory system are the deep layers of the

  1. A) primary auditory cortex.
  2. B) basilar membrane.
  3. C) superior colliculus.
  4. D) semicircular canals.
  5. E) cochlear nucleus.

Answer: C

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

27)  Barn owls are often used in auditory research on sound localization because they have

  1. A) excellent sound localization ability.
  2. B) large ears.
  3. C) a large auditory cortex.
  4. D) poor vision.
  5. E) both B and C

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 168

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

28)  Much of the recent research on sound localization has focused on the

  1. A) cochlea.
  2. B) barn owl.
  3. C) snail.
  4. D) mouse.
  5. E) cat.

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 168

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

29)  The primary auditory cortex is in the

  1. A) temporal lobe.
  2. B) lateral fissure.
  3. C) occipital lobe.
  4. D) frontal lobe.
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: E

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 168

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

30)  Much of the human auditory cortex is invisible to casual inspection because it is in the __________ fissure.

  1. A) central
  2. B) lateral
  3. C) longitudinal
  4. D) calcarine
  5. E) postcentral

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 168

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

31) The arrow points to

  1. A) the central fissure.
  2. B) vestibular cortex.
  3. C) gustatory cortex.
  4. D) auditory cortex.
  5. E) olfactory cortex.

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 168

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

32)  Neurons of the monkey secondary auditory cortex respond robustly to

  1. A) bird calls.
  2. B) pure tones.
  3. C) monkey calls.
  4. D) the location of sounds.
  5. E) pitch.

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 168

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

33)  Investigators have proposed that in each hemisphere, there are two major streams of

  1. A) visual information
  2. B) auditory information.
  3. C) vestibular information.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: E

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 169

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

34)  The perception of pitch in primates seems to occur in

  1. A) the thalamus.
  2. B) one small cortical area just anterior to primary auditory cortex.
  3. C) association cortex.
  4. D) primary auditory cortex.
  5. E) all areas of association cortex together.

Answer: B

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 169

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

35)  Which of the following has played a major role in the research differentiating neurons that respond to pitch from those that respond to frequency?

  1. A) missing fundamentals
  2. B) primary auditory cortex
  3. C) tinnitus
  4. D) barn owls
  5. E) posterior auditory pathway

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 169

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

36)  In humans and other primates, large bilateral auditory cortex lesions produce

  1. A) permanent total deafness.
  2. B) permanent partial deafness.
  3. C) a permanent deficit in the ability to localize sounds and discriminate frequencies.
  4. D) total deafness that is permanent only in the ipsilateral field.
  5. E) total deafness that is permanent only in the contralateral field.

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 170

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

37)  The permanent effects of bilateral auditory cortex damage are surprisingly minor in primates although they do include disruption of the ability to

  1. A) detect sounds, but only those presented to the contralateral ear.
  2. B) discriminate frequencies.
  3. C) localize sounds.
  4. D) both A and B
  5. E) both B and C

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 170

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Factual)

 

 

38)  Bilateral damage to which of the following auditory structures would be most likely to produce complete and permanent hearing loss?

  1. A) primary auditory cortex
  2. B) superior colliculus
  3. C) cochlear nerve
  4. D) secondary auditory cortex
  5. E) association cortex

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 170

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Applied)

 

 

39)  Tinnitus

  1. A) always accompanies hearing loss.
  2. B) is always cured by cutting the contralateral auditory nerve.
  3. C) is always cured by cutting the ipsilateral auditory nerve.
  4. D) both A and C
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 170

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: Hearing loss is only sometimes associated with tinnitus, thus A is incorrect.

 

40)  The somatosensory system is

  1. A) exteroceptive.
  2. B) proprioceptive.
  3. C) interoceptive.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 171

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

41)  The sense of touch is largely

  1. A) exteroceptive.
  2. B) proprioceptive.
  3. C) interoceptive.
  4. D) nociceptive.
  5. E) slow-adapting.

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 171

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

42)  Nociceptive stimuli are

  1. A) exteroceptive.
  2. B) mechanical.
  3. C) thermal.
  4. D) painful.
  5. E) bad.

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 171

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

43)  The cutaneous somatosensory system responds to

  1. A) nociceptive stimuli.
  2. B) thermal stimuli.
  3. C) mechanical stimuli.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

44)  The perception of both pain and changes in skin temperature are largely mediated by

  1. A) free nerve endings.
  2. B) Pacinian corpuscles.
  3. C) nociceptors.
  4. D) temperoceptors.
  5. E) red corpuscles.

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

45)  Free nerve endings are thought to mediate the perception of

  1. A) pressure.
  2. B) pain.
  3. C) skin temperature.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both B and C

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

46)  The Pacinian corpuscle is

  1. A) the largest cutaneous receptor.
  2. B) the most deeply positioned cutaneous receptor.
  3. C) fast adapting.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

47)  Pacinian corpuscles, Merkel’s disks, and Ruffini endings are

  1. A) blood cells.
  2. B) auditory receptors.
  3. C) receptors in the skin.
  4. D) taste receptors.
  5. E) nuclei in the somatosensory system.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

48)  The identification of objects by touch is

  1. A) proprioception.
  2. B) lewd.
  3. C) vestibulation.
  4. D) stereognosis.
  5. E) astereognosia.

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

49)  A dermatome is a

  1. A) slowly adapting cutaneous receptor.
  2. B) fast adapting cutaneous receptor.
  3. C) free nerve ending.
  4. D) both A and C
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: E

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

50)  The area of the body that is innervated by the left and right dorsal roots of a given segment of the spinal cord is one

  1. A) dermatome.
  2. B) stereognosis.
  3. C) Ruffini ending.
  4. D) region of glabrous skin.
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

51)  The destruction of a single dorsal root typically produces little somatosensory loss because

  1. A) there are few cutaneous receptors in the back.
  2. B) the dorsal roots soon degenerate.
  3. C) there is considerable overlap of projections from adjacent dermatomes.
  4. D) the dorsal roots accurately regenerate.
  5. E) the somatosensory system has a motor component.

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

52)  The dorsal-column medial-lemniscus system and the anterolateral system both carry sensory information from the

  1. A) eyes.
  2. B) ears.
  3. C) skin.
  4. D) nose.
  5. E) mouth.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

53)  The dorsal-column medial-lemniscus system is particularly responsive to

  1. A) sound and movement.
  2. B) touch and proprioception.
  3. C) motor output.
  4. D) tickle and temperature.
  5. E) pain and temperature.

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

54)  The anterolateral system is particularly responsive to

  1. A) pain.
  2. B) temperature.
  3. C) tickle.
  4. D) all of the above.
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: E

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 175

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

55)  The dorsal columns are composed of the axons of

  1. A) cutaneous somatosensory neurons.
  2. B) neurons with their cell bodies in the cochlear nuclei.
  3. C) neurons with their cell bodies in the dorsal column nuclei.
  4. D) several branches of the trigeminal nerve.
  5. E) medial lemniscus neurons.

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

56)  The neurons of the ventral posterior nucleus project to

  1. A) SI, SII, and the posterior parietal cortex.
  2. B) the thalamus.
  3. C) the medial lemniscus.
  4. D) the dorsal column nuclei.
  5. E) the auditory cortex.

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

57)  The longest neuron in the human body

  1. A) is a finger neuron.
  2. B) has its cell body in the spinal cord.
  3. C) is part of the anterolateral system.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) is somatosensory neuron with one end in a toe and the other in the dorsal column nuclei.

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

58)  Most of the neurons of the anterolateral system decussate in the

  1. A) spinal cord.
  2. B) lower brain stem.
  3. C) midbrain.
  4. D) corpus callosum.
  5. E) medulla.

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

59)  The anterolateral system comprises the

  1. A) spinothalamic tract.
  2. B) spinoreticular tract.
  3. C) spinotectal tract.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both B and C Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

60)  Dorsal columns are to anterolateral pathways as

  1. A) pain is to temperature.
  2. B) touch is to temperature and pain.
  3. C) exteroceptive is to interoceptive.
  4. D) free nerve endings are to Pacinian corpuscles.
  5. E) temperature is to tickle.

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

 

61)  Which of the following somatosensory structures do not receive substantial input from the anterolateral system?

  1. A) dorsal column nuclei
  2. B) tectum
  3. C) reticular formation
  4. D) colliculi
  5. E) thalamus

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

62)  The ventral posterior nuclei of the thalamus receive direct input from the

  1. A) dorsal-column medial-lemniscus system.
  2. B) spinotectal tract.
  3. C) spinoreticular tract.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both B and C

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

Rationale: This seems like a difficult question, however it is obvious that B ends in the tectum and C ends in the reticular formation, leaving A as the only possible correct answer.

 

63)  Which tract is part of the anterolateral somatosensory system?

  1. A) spinoreticular tract
  2. B) spinothalamic tract
  3. C) spinotectal tract
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) dorsal columns

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

64)  Primary somatosensory cortex is in the

  1. A) postcentral gyrus.
  2. B) precentral gyrus.
  3. C) occipital lobe.
  4. D) frontal lobe.
  5. E) both B and D

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 174

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

65)  Some of the primary somatosensory cortex is in the

  1. A) central fissure.
  2. B) lateral fissure.
  3. C) longitudinal fissure.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 177

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

66)  Much of SII is

  1. A) adjacent to SI.
  2. B) in the lateral fissure.
  3. C) in the parietal cortex.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 174-175

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

67)  Research has shown that SI

  1. A) is really SII.
  2. B) includes SII.
  3. C) is posterior to SII.
  4. D) is organized in four somatotopically organized, parallel strips.
  5. E) is smaller than SII.

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 174

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

68)  Unilateral damage to SI

  1. A) eliminates the sense of touch in the contralateral hand.
  2. B) eliminates the sense of touch in the ipsilateral hand.
  3. C) produces contralateral neglect.
  4. D) produces contralateral deficits in stereognosis.
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 175

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: The point here is that the effects are surprisingly mild.

 

 

 

 

69)  Unilateral excision of SI produces a contralateral deficit in the ability to

  1. A) detect light touch.
  2. B) identify objects by touch.
  3. C) feel anything with the hand.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 175

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

Rationale: The effects are surprisingly mild.

 

70)  The inability to identify objects by touch is

  1. A) astereognosia.
  2. B) stereognosis.
  3. C) asomatognosia.
  4. D) anosognosia.
  5. E) apraxia.

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 175

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: Stereognosis is the ability to identify objects by touch: B is incorrect.

 

71)  Astereognosia and asomatognosia are the two major types of

  1. A) touch blindness.
  2. B) apraxia.
  3. C) somatosensory agnosia.
  4. D) contralateral neglect.
  5. E) stereognosis.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 176

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

 

 

72)  Harold Klawans’s neurological case of Aunt Betty suffered from a form of

  1. A) asomatognosia.
  2. B) prosopagnosia.
  3. C) color agnosia.
  4. D) stereognosis.
  5. E) anosmia.

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 176

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

 

 

 

 

 

73)  Asomatognosia is often associated with

  1. A) stereognosis.
  2. B) anosognosia.
  3. C) contralateral neglect.
  4. D) the rubber hand illusion.
  5. E) both B and C

Answer: E

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 176-177

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: These relations are described in the text and illustrated by the case of Aunt Betty.

 

74)  Which of the following is often associated with asomatognosia?

  1. A) the rubber hand illusion
  2. B) aphasia
  3. C) anosognosia
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 176

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: It is difficult to understand how patients with such extreme deficits can fail to recognize them (i.e., to have anosognosia); the case of Aunt Betty illustrates this condition.

 

75)  Hemispherectomized patients feel

  1. A) no pain.
  2. B) no pain from the contralateral side of the body.
  3. C) no pain from the ipsilateral side of the body.
  4. D) pain from both sides of the body.
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: Surprisingly, removal of a hemisphere has little effect on the perception of pain.

 

76) Illustrated here is the cortical area most commonly linked to the perception of pain: the

  1. A) anterior cingulate cortex.
  2. B) periaqueductal gray matter.
  3. C) gate control cortex.
  4. D) pain mucosa.
  5. E) dorsolateral frontal cortex.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

77)  The cortical area that has most frequently been linked to pain by functional brain imaging studies is the

  1. A) anterior cingulate cortex.
  2. B) secondary somatosensory cortex.
  3. C) posterior parietal cortex.
  4. D) inferotemporal cortex.
  5. E) PAG.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

78)  Evidence suggests that the anterior cingulate cortex plays a major role in the

  1. A) expectation of pain.
  2. B) adaptive responses to minimize pain.
  3. C) emotional reaction to pain.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) perception of pain.

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

79)  Evidence for the existence of a descending pain-control circuit came from the finding that

  1. A) stimulation of the PAG produces analgesia.
  2. B) the PAG contains opiate receptors.
  3. C) some opiates are endogenous.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

 

 

80)  Electrical stimulation of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) produces

  1. A) opiates.
  2. B) serotonin.
  3. C) analgesia.
  4. D) opiate receptors.
  5. E) pain.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

81)  Electrical stimulation of which of the following structures has analgesic effects?

  1. A) SII
  2. B) periaqueductal gray
  3. C) paraventricular nuclei
  4. D) ventral posterior nuclei
  5. E) medial lemniscus

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

82)  Morphine is an

  1. A) analgesic.
  2. B) opiate.
  3. C) endogenously produced.
  4. D) both A and B
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: Morphine is derived from the opium poppy and is not synthesized in the body: C is incorrect.

 

83)  The descending PAG-raphé-dorsal-column circuit has been hypothesized to mediate

  1. A) some types of pain.
  2. B) some types of analgesia.
  3. C) touch.
  4. D) audition.
  5. E) stereognosis.

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: This is the classic descending analgesia circuit.

 

84)  The analgesia-mediating axons descending in the dorsal columns originate in

  1. A) the PAG.
  2. B) the raphé nucleus.
  3. C) SI.
  4. D) SII.
  5. E) the ventral posterior nuclei.

Answer: B

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

85)  The PAG is to the raphé as

  1. A) opiate is to serotonin.
  2. B) serotonin is to opiate.
  3. C) pain is to analgesia.
  4. D) analgesia is to pain.
  5. E) descending is to ascending.

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

 

86)  Severe chronic pain in the absence of a recognizable pain stimulus is classified as

  1. A) psychophysiological.
  2. B) analgesic.
  3. C) neuropathic.
  4. D) pheromonal.
  5. E) psychophysical.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 179

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Applied)

 

 

87)  Smell and taste

  1. A) are the most well understood of the exteroceptive sensory systems.
  2. B) combine to produce the sensation of flavor.
  3. C) have only recently evolved.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 179

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

88)  Much of the interest in the chemical senses stems from the fact that

  1. A) their physiology is particularly simple.
  2. B) their anatomy and physiology are well understood.
  3. C) they play important roles in the social lives of many species.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 180

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

89)  In one experiment, a male hamster intruder was converted from the object of assassination to an object of lust by

  1. A) injecting it with estrogen.
  2. B) injecting it with testosterone.
  3. C) swabbing it with lemon.
  4. D) swabbing it with the vaginal secretions of an ovulating female.
  5. E) swabbing it with expensive perfume.

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 180

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

90)  Olfactory receptors are embedded in the

  1. A) olfactory mucosa.
  2. B) nose hairs.
  3. C) olfactory nucleus.
  4. D) olfactory neocortex.
  5. E) cribriform plate.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 180

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

91)  The axons of the olfactory receptors run through the

  1. A) olfactory bulb to the thalamus.
  2. B) olfactory bulb to the paleocortex.
  3. C) cribriform plate to the thalamus.
  4. D) cribriform plate to the olfactory bulbs.
  5. E) olfactory epithelium to olfactory cortex.

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 180

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

92)  Various parts of olfactory receptor cells can be found

  1. A) in the nasal passages.
  2. B) in the olfactory mucosa.
  3. C) passing through the cribriform plate.
  4. D) in the olfactory bulb.
  5. E) all of the above

Answer: E

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 180

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

93)  For decades, it had been assumed that mammals had only a small number of olfactory

  1. A) receptor cells.
  2. B) receptor types.
  3. C) receptors.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 180

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

94)  Evidence suggests that humans have about __________ different types of olfactory receptors.

  1. A) 3
  2. B) 5
  3. C) 7
  4. D) 16
  5. E) 350

Answer: E

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

95)  How many types of receptor protein molecules are contained by each olfactory receptor cell?

  1. A) 1
  2. B) 3
  3. C) 4
  4. D) 7
  5. E) about 350

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.4  Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

96)  All of the olfactory receptor cells with the same receptor protein

  1. A) are located in the same part of the mucosa.
  2. B) are scattered throughout the mucosa.
  3. C) project to the same locations (glomeruli) of the olfactory bulbs.
  4. D) both A and C
  5. E) both B and C

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

 

97)  Olfactory receptor cells

  1. A) contain no receptor molecules.
  2. B) survive for only a few weeks and are replaced by new ones.
  3. C) have no axons.
  4. D) each contain three different receptor molecules.
  5. E) each contain 350 different receptor molecules.

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

98)  Each olfactory receptor cell survives for a few

  1. A) decades.
  2. B) years.
  3. C) months.
  4. D) weeks.
  5. E) days.

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

99)  The olfactory tracts project from the olfactory bulbs to the structure of the medial temporal lobes, particularly to the

  1. A) amygdala.
  2. B) thalamus.
  3. C) piriform cortex.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4  Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

100)  Two major olfactory pathways leave the amygdala-piriform area. One projects diffusely to the limbic system; the other projects to the

  1. A) medial dorsal nuclei of the thalamus and then to the orbitofrontal cortex.
  2. B) hippocampus and caudate.
  3. C) striatum and olfactory bulb.
  4. D) olfactory bulb and SI.
  5. E) basal forebrain and cingulate.

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4  Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

101)  Although it is somewhat arbitrary, primary olfactory cortex is considered to be

  1. A) piriform cortex.
  2. B) in the thalamus.
  3. C) in the orbits.
  4. D) olfactory bulbs.
  5. E) in the glomeruli.

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

102)  Olfactory neocortex is considered to be in the

  1. A) occipital lobe.
  2. B) thalamus.
  3. C) parietal lobe.
  4. D) piriform cortex.
  5. E) glomeruli.

Answer: D

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

103)  Taste receptors typically occur in clusters of 50 to 100. These clusters are called

  1. A) glomeruli.
  2. B) taste buds.
  3. C) taste receptor nuclei.
  4. D) papillae.
  5. E) taste mucosas.

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

104)  __________ are found in __________, which are often located around small protuberances called __________.

  1. A) Taste receptors; taste buds; papillae
  2. B) Taste buds; taste receptors; papillae
  3. C) Taste receptors; papillae; taste buds
  4. D) Taste buds; papillae; taste receptors
  5. E) Papillae; taste receptors; taste buds

Answer: A

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

105)  Unlike olfactory receptors, each taste receptor has no

  1. A) cytoplasm.
  2. B) axon.
  3. C) nucleus.
  4. D) receptors.
  5. E) ion channels.

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

106)  There seem to be five primary tastes: sweetRemember,ur, bitter, salty, and

  1. A) fatty.
  2. B) umami.
  3. C) oily.
  4. D) mamawawa.
  5. E) yumyumi.

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

107)  The conventional view that all tastes are encoded by various combinations of activity in five primary taste receptors has a problem:

  1. A) No receptors have been discovered for salty and sour.
  2. B) Evidence suggests that there may be more than five primary tastes.
  3. C) Many tastes cannot be created from combinations of the five current primaries.
  4. D) Thirty receptors have been discovered for bitter.
  5. E) all of the above

Answer: E

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

108)  Gustatory afferents leave the mouth as part of the

  1. A) facial nerve.
  2. B) glossopharyngeal nerve.
  3. C) vagus nerve.
  4. D) all of the above
  5. E) none of the above

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

109)  The main medullary nucleus of the gustatory system is the

  1. A) solitary nucleus.
  2. B) red nucleus.
  3. C) dorsal column nucleus.
  4. D) ventral posterior nucleus.
  5. E) piriform nucleus.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

110)  The primary gustatory cortex is in the

  1. A) longitudinal fissure.
  2. B) central fissure.
  3. C) lateral fissure.
  4. D) occipital lobe.
  5. E) temporal lobe.

Answer: C

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

111)  Unlike the projections of the other exteroceptive sensory systems, the projections of the gustatory system are primarily

  1. A) contralateral.
  2. B) ipsilateral.
  3. C) unilateral.
  4. D) bilateral.
  5. E) descending.

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Factual)

 

 

112)  Gustation is to olfaction as

  1. A) flavor is to odor.
  2. B) onions are to potatoes.
  3. C) thalamus is to neocortex.
  4. D) ageusia is to anosmia.
  5. E) NaCl is to thiamine.

Answer: D

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: Ageusia is the inability to taste: anosmia is the inability to smell.

 

 

 

113)  The most common neurological cause of anosmia is

  1. A) a tumor.
  2. B) an infection.
  3. C) a blow to the head.
  4. D) a convulsion.
  5. E) a blow to the nose.

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Applied)

 

 

114)  Anosmia typically results when the olfactory receptor cells are sheared by the

  1. A) septum.
  2. B) olfactory mucosa.
  3. C) cribriform plate.
  4. D) chorda tympani.
  5. E) olfactory bulbs.

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Applied)

 

 

115) Ageusia is very rare, presumably because

  1. A) people have such poor taste to begin with.
  2. B) the tongue is protected in the mouth.
  3. C) taste information from the mouth is carried via three separate sensory pathways.
  4. D) olfactory information from the nose is carried via three separate sensory pathways.
  5. E) olfactory information from the nose is carried via two separate sensory pathways.

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Applied)

 

 

116)  The ability to focus on only a small subset of the stimuli that are being received by sensory organs is called

  1. A) subliminal perception.
  2. B) selective attention.
  3. C) selective perception.
  4. D) subliminal attention.
  5. E) sensory focus.

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

 

117)  Selective attention

  1. A) improves the perception of stimuli that are its focus.
  2. B) has no effect on perception.
  3. C) seems to depend totally on thalamic mechanisms.
  4. D) seems to depend totally on changes in receptors.
  5. E) blocks out, just slightly, the perception of those stimuli that are its focus.

Answer: A

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

118)  Endogenous attention is mediated by

  1. A) top-down mechanisms.
  2. B) bottom-up mechanisms.
  3. C) recurrent collateral inhibition.
  4. D) exogenous inhibition.
  5. E) subliminal perception.

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

119)  The mechanisms of selective attention are

  1. A) top-down.
  2. B) bottom-up.
  3. C) inside-out.
  4. D) outside-in.
  5. E) both A and B

Answer: E

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

120) Stare at the + sign and without moving your eyes, shift your focus from one letter to another. You have just experienced

  1. A) overt attention.
  2. B) covert attention.
  3. C) the cocktail party phenomenon.
  4. D) bottom-up attention.
  5. E) exogenous attention.

Answer: B

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

 

121)  The cocktail-party phenomenon refers to your ability to “focus on” a specific conversation at a cocktail party while

  1. A) drunk out of your mind.
  2. B) unconsciously monitoring other conversations.
  3. C) being totally conscious of other conversations.
  4. D) talking to someone else.
  5. E) eating.

Answer: B

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

122)  If you were looking at holiday slides of your family and a major background object, such as a tree, moved as you blinked, you would likely

  1. A) experience change blindness.
  2. B) have your attention drawn from your family to the tree.
  3. C) immediately notice the movement.
  4. D) both A and B
  5. E) both A and C

Answer: A

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

123)  In one functional brain imaging study, attention to movement was associated with increased activity in the

  1. A) primary visual cortex.
  2. B) ventral stream.
  3. C) dorsal stream.
  4. D) thalamus.
  5. E) optic chiasm.

Answer: C

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 185

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Factual)

 

 

124)  A difficulty in attending to more than one visual object at a time is

  1. A) visual agnosia.
  2. B) visual prosopagnosia.
  3. C) visual simultanagnosia.
  4. D) change blindness.
  5. E) visual ageusia.

Answer: C

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 186

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Applied)

Rationale: This is the disorder illustrated by the chapter-opening case study.

 

Fill-in-the-Blank Questions

 

1)  Sensory systems are hierarchical, parallel, and __________ segregated.

Answer: functionally

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 163

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: Factual

 

2)  The three ossicles transmit auditory vibrations from the ear drum to the __________ window.

Answer: oval

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 166

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: Factual

 

3)  The organ of Corti comprises the tectorial membrane, hair cells, and __________ membrane.

Answer: basilar

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 166

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: Factual

 

4)  The organization of the auditory system is not retinotopic; it is __________.

Answer: tonotopic

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 167

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: Factual

 

5)  Hearing loss is sometimes associated with __________ (ringing of the ears).

Answer: tinnitus

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 177

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: Applied

 

6)  The somatosensory system is three interacting systems: one interoceptive, one exteroceptive, and one __________.

Answer: proprioceptive

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 171

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

7)  Painful stimuli are also referred to as __________ stimuli.

Answer: nociceptive

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 171

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

8)  The identification of objects by touch is called __________.

Answer: stereognosis

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

9)  A __________ is an area of the body that is innervated by the dorsal roots of one segment of the spinal cord.

Answer: dermatome

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 172

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: Factual

 

10)  The __________ system carries pain and temperature information from the body to the brain.

Answer: anterolateral

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

11)  The axons of dorsal column nuclei decussate and then ascend in the medial lemniscus to the ventral posterior nucleus of the __________ .

Answer: thalamus

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 176

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

12)  The spinothalamic, spinoreticular, and spinotectal somatosensory tracts are all part of the __________ system.

Answer: anterolateral

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

13)  Primary __________ cortex is in the postcentral gyrus.

Answer: somatosensory

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 174

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

14)  SI is also known as the __________ somatosensory cortex.

Answer: primary

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 174

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

15)  The inability to recognize objects by touch is __________.

Answer: astereognosia

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 176

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Applied

 

16)  An analgesia circuit descends into the spinal cord from the __________ gray.

Answer: periaqueductal

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 178

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: Factual

 

17)  __________ are chemicals that are released by some species and influence the physiology and behavior of conspecifics.

Answer: Pheromones

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 180

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: Factual

 

18)  The __________ cortex is considered to be the primary olfactory cortex

Answer: piriform

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 181

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: Factual

 

19)  The inability to smell is called __________.

Answer: anosmia

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 182

Topic: 7.4 Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: Applied

 

20)  In contrast to endogenous attention, exogenous attention is mediated by __________ neural mechanisms.

Answer: bottom-up

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: Factual

 

21)  We experience change blindness because we have absolutely no memory for parts of a scene that are not the focus of __________.

Answer: attention

Diff: 1  Page Ref: 184

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: Factual

 

Essay and other multiple-mark Questions

 

1)  The modern model of sensory system organization features three important principles. Name them and explain them. Draw a representation of the modern model.

Answer:

25% for naming and discussing hierarchical organization

25% for naming and discussing functional segregation

25% for naming and discussing parallel processing

25% for drawing the modern model

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 162-164

Topic: 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization

Type: (Conceptual)

 

2)  Discuss current knowledge of auditory cortex, emphasizing both difficulties and successes.

Answer:

25% for discussing location and organization in columns of primary auditory cortex

25% for discussing the problems created by the complexity of auditory neuron responses to sound

25% for discussing the two hypothetical cortical streams of auditory information

25% for discussing the cortical localization of pitch discrimination

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 168-170

Topic: 7.2 Auditory System

Type: (Conceptual)

 

3)  Compare the anatomy of the two major ascending somatosensory pathways: the dorsal-column medial lemniscus pathway and the anterolateral pathway. Draw them. What are their functions?

Answer:

50% for comparing the two systems

30% for drawing the two systems

20% for comparing the functions of the two systems

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 173-174

Topic: 7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain

Type: (Factual)

 

4)  The chemical senses are unique in several ways. Describe and discuss two ways in which either the gustatory or olfactory systems is different from other sensory systems.

Answer:

50% for describing each difference

Diff: 3  Page Ref: 179-182

Topic: 7.4 The Chemical Senses: Smell and Taste

Type: (Conceptual)

 

5)  Describe and discuss two important aspects of selective attention. In your discussion, explain why you think that these two aspects are important, and describe any relevant research.

Answer:

50% for describing two differences

50% for discussing the two selected differences

Diff: 2  Page Ref: 184-186

Topic: 7.5 Selective Attention

Type: (Conceptual)

 

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