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HDEV3 Human Development 3rd Edition Rathus Test Bank

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HDEV3 Human Development 3rd Edition Rathus Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1285057224

ISBN-10: 1285057228

 

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HDEV3 Human Development 3rd Edition Rathus Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1285057224

ISBN-10: 1285057228

 

 

 

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Free Nursing Test Questions:

 

Chapter 19—Life’s Final Chapter

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. American culture tends to deny the existence of death. Which of the following is an example of how it does that, according to Kübler-Ross (1969)?
a. People tend to use the word “died” instead of more comfortable terms to refer to a person who has died.
b. How the dead bodies are prepared for viewings.
c. Children are usually encouraged to attend funerals and family events surrounding a death.
d. Medicine encourages physicians to accept death as a part of their job, and to view it with acceptance rather than resistance.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. The definition of death:
a. is universally sanctioned by different religious leaderships.
b. relates to the fact that death is a part of life.
c. is unrelated to how we view life.
d. is different from that of dying.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Ima was in a car accident and her cerebral cortex showed a flat EEG line in the hospital after she was brought in. The doctor declared that :
a. she had whole brain death. c. she had brain death.
b. she was in a coma. d. she was in a persistent vegetative state

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. According to your author death has many different meanings. It is not, however, a(n) ________ matter.
a. biological c. emotional
b. legal d. educational

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Although it is often complicated, the definition of death
a. is usually determined by whether or not one’s heart has stopped.
b. is determined by whether CPR has been administered or not.
c. relates exclusively to brain activity.
d. most frequently involves an absence of activity in one’s EEG recording.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Brain death:
a. is the same thing as when the heart stops.
b. involves the activity of the cortex as measured by an EEG.
c. occurs when there is no electrical activity in the brain at all.
d. cannot be measured using existing methods.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Whole brain death:
a. occurs when the cerebral cortex has no EEG reading.
b. may involve lower brain activity, but no cortical activity.
c. involves an absence of breathing and circulation without life-support machinery.
d. is the definition most frequently used in legal cases where a person’s status is in question

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Irreversible cessation of breathing and circulation or if there is an irreversible cessation of brain activity (including the brain stem) is considered:
a. the legal definition of death in most states.
b. the same thing as whole brain death.
c. an old definition of death, not what is currently used.
d. only part of the definition of death used in most states today.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Kübler-Ross’s (1969) stages of death include all of the following except:
a. denial c. bargaining
b. absence d. depression

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following statements is an example of “denial”, according to Kübler-Ross (1969)?
a. The diagnosis must be wrong.
b. Why is God punishing me?
c. I promise to be good if this illness goes away
d. I understand that I am going to die and I am going to prepare for it.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Which of the following statements represents the “bargaining” stage identified by Kübler-Ross (1969)?
a. I will help the poor at my church if I can live longer.
b. Life has no meaning
c. I plan to die with dignity
d. This is the doctor’s fault for misdiagnosing me

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following statements reflects the “acceptance” stage of Kübler-Ross (1969)?
a. Why me?
b. It’s not fair
c. Someone must have made a mistake.
d. It’s been a good life, and I’m ready for it to end.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. A few weeks after John received a diagnosis of terminal cancer from his doctor, he flew into a rage, breaking things in his office, screaming about how unfair “this” is, and raging at fate. He was demonstrating which of the stages of dying identified by Kübler-Ross?
a. denial c. anger
b. bargaining d. depression

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. According to Retsinas (1988) the stages of dying proposed by Kübler-Ross’s apply best to:
a. older adults
b. people for whom physicians have not been able to make a concrete diagnosis
c. people with a terminal illness diagnosis
d. parents who have lost a child to illness or accident

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. After hearing about her friend’s death in a car accident, Lily continued to call her friend’s phone and send her email messages. Lily’s behavior is likely to be an example of which stage of dying, identified by Kübler-Ross?
a. depression c. bargaining
b. anger d. denial

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Betsy has been diagnosed with a terminal illness for three months and has been praying to God and asking to be spared in exchange for her attending church more frequently and helping others who were needy. She is demonstrating which of the stages dying identified by Kübler-Ross (1969)?
a. anger c. denial
b. bargaining d. acceptance

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Peter has been hospitalized for a week with a severe case of pneumonia. His loved ones are surrounding him and he has said goodbye to all of them. He is demonstrating the _____ stage of dying identified by Kübler-Ross (1969)?
a. denial c. depression
b. bargaining d. acceptance

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Tameka has two young children and she was recently diagnosed with terminal stage breast cancer. She cries a lot and worries about what will happen to her children when she is gone. She is demonstrating the _____ stage of dying identified by Kübler-Ross.
a. denial c. acceptance
b. bargaining d. depression

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Depression     REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Current “death education” suggests:
a. Kübler-Ross was wrong about the stages of dying.
b. people should fight death to the end.
c. people should be supported as they go through the stages of death identified by Kübler-Ross.
d. if people resist the stages proposed by Kübler-Ross they should be “urged” to experience them for their own mental well-being.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Critiques of Kübler-Ross’ stages of dying have suggested:
a. people should not be helped through the stages of dying.
b. most people die from terminal illnesses which is not relevant to the stages
c. the stages may occur in varying stages for different people.
d. this only applies to older adults.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Shneidman (1977) conducted research on dying people and found that:
a. Kübler-Ross’ stages applied perfectly to their situations.
b. everyone responded the same way to dying.
c. people react to dying in clear stages, but differently than identified by Kübler-Ross.
d. people often react to dying as they reacted to other events in their lives.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. The key factors to affect the adjustment people make to their impending deaths include all but which of the following?
a. type and extent of organic cerebral impairment.
b. pain and weakness
c. time or phase of a person’s life
d. financial security

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. The case of Terri Schiavo who suffered from brain damage after a heart attack:
a. was a simple case of determining if her brain was functioning or not.
b. had legal, religious, and philosophical issues.
c. resulted in her waking from her coma to a complete recovery.
d. was summarily ignored by Congress, who stated unanimously that they had no jurisdiction to create any policies for her case.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. The case of Terri Schiavo, which was about a woman in a vegetative stated, showed:
a. how united the country is about euthanasia.
b. ended with her coming out of her coma.
c. that such end-of-life issues may be very controversial
d. that family should decide the fate of a loved one in a coma.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. These days most people die:
a. in their own home in their own beds
b. the way they did 100 years ago.
c. with family members gathered at home around their death bed.
d. somewhere other than at home.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is where most people die nowadays in the U.S.?
a. at home in bed c. in a nursing home.
b. at home, but not in bed d. in a hospital

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Dying in a hospital:
a. is considered inhumane by most people.
b. is more common than dying at home these days.
c. is rarely done in the U.S. today.
d. is usually a result of uncaring family members.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Of those who receive hospice care, the most common location for their death is
a. in a private residence c. in a nursing home
b. in a hospital d. in a hospice inpatient facility

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Hospice focuses on:
a. the course and treatment of the disease. c. curing someone
b. extending life. d. controlling pain.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Which of the following is true of hospice?
a. it is usually reserved for people who are expected to get well rather than those who are dying.
b. it is only available in hospitals.
c. it provides health care and little else.
d. it focuses on dying with dignity and with as little pain as possible.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Elizabeth was diagnosed with three months to live from terminal cancer and has moved back into her home from the hospital. She has a doctor, nurses, a social worker, and a minister visiting her on a regular basis. She is most likely receiving care from:
a. hospital workers who are taking pity on her.
b. family members.
c. hospice
d. a nursing home.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Which of the following is most likely to work with a dying patient through hospice care?
a. a doula c. a pastoral counselor
b. a midwife d. a funeral home director

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Hospice care:
a. takes control over someone’s situation so he/she won’t have to make any decisions.
b. focuses on curing the patient of his/her illness.
c. only works with the dying patient.
d. provides medication to relieve pain and other services to help the patient and his/her family.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Bereavement specialists working for hospice typically:
a. work in teams.
b. try to counsel the dying person to allow for active euthanasia.
c. take control over the situation since the dying person won’t be capable of making decisions.
d. focus on the dying individual and leave their family’s grieving to other therapists.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

 

  1. Hospice care is often :
a. too expensive for most patients to afford.
b. more costly than hospital care.
c. covered by insurance.
d. administered without the input of medical professionals.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is true regarding hospice care?
a. It focuses on palliative rather than curative care.
b. It treats the disease, not the patient.
c. It emphasizes quantity of life, not quality.
d. It recommends shortening one’s life in many cases.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Hospice provides bereavement counseling for all but which of the following?
a. to patients.
b. for families whose family member died.
c. for families whose family member is dying.
d. to coworkers of the dying individual

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. The term “hospice”:
a. derives from the Latin term that means “hospitality”
b. means the same as hospital.
c. relates to the Latin for death.
d. comes from the Greek hospitunum which means “death with comfort.”

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Palliative care focuses on:
a. life extension c. cures
b. pain management d. old people

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is recommended to those who are supporting a dying person?
a. Don’t talk about the impending death.
b. Don’t touch the person too much.
c. Don’t talk about your own problems
d. Don’t minimize the person’s pain or need to grieve.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

 

 

 

 

  1. People who are dying:
a. always want to talk about their impending death.
b. have the same feelings about their dying every day.
c. always want to avoid talking about their impending death.
d. may want to talk about someone else’s problems and other events at times.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Euthanasia:
a. is illegal throughout the world.
b. is also known as mercy killing.
c. occurs when someone kills another person against their will.
d. always involves removing life support.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. “Euthanasia” means:
a. the good life c. pain management
b. good care d. the good death

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is an example of active euthanasia?
a. when a physician administers a lethal dose of medication to a dying patient.
b. when a person helps another person kill themselves.
c. when a person removes life support from a comatose patient.
d. when a person provides information for another person on the best way to die painlessly.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Active euthanasia:
a. is legal in all 50 states.
b. is almost universally accepted as a reasonable course of action when a dying person is in an enormous amount of pain.
c. may include voluntary or involuntary involvement of the patient.
d. cannot be punished criminally because the intent is kind.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Which of the following is an example of passive euthanasia?
a. Providing medication to put a patient into a coma
b. Failing to resuscitate a patient who stops breathing
c. Injecting a patient with enough medication to kill him or her
d. Holding a pillow over a patient’s nose and mouth to cause asphyxiation.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is an example of voluntary active euthanasia?
a. providing the pills for someone to end their own life
b. removing life support from a comatose patient
c. shooting someone who has not expressed a desire to die
d. opting not to provide CPR to an elderly patient who is in cardiac arrest

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Jack Kevorkian:
a. started the idea of active euthanasia.
b. is a physician opposed to euthanasia and jailed for his dissent.
c. is also known as “Dr. Death”.
d. was never jailed for his actions.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is an example of terminal sedation?
a. providing a lethal injection to a prisoner who is receiving the death penalty
b. removing a breathing tube from a comatose patient
c. providing enough barbiturates to a patient who is dying so he/she becomes unconscious
d. allowing an intravenous line of narcotics to run “full and wide” so that the medications stop the patient’s heart.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Terminal sedation is:
a. the same thing as active euthanasia.
b. used to reduce pain or anxiety in a dying patient.
c. a way to hasten death.
d. the medical term for the lethal injection used for prisoners who have been sentenced to death.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Involuntary active euthanasia:
a. is the same as physician-assisted suicide
b. occurs when a comatose patient has life-support removed without prior consent.
c. is legal in all fifty states
d. requires the assent of at least three licensed physicians.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Physician-assisted suicide:
a. is not controversial in the U.S. today.
b. usually involves voluntary active euthanasia.
c. is recommended by the American Medical Association.
d. is practiced by most doctors in the U.S. today.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Physicians who oppose physician-assisted suicide:
a. are rare in the U.S. today.
b. are acting illegally.
c. often believe that it goes against their medical traditions.
d. believe that it is impossible to relieve patient suffering in other ways.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. A survey of physicians’ views about euthanasia has shown:
a. no doctors support it.
b. all doctors support it.
c. most objected to withdrawing life support but not to delivering lethal doses of medication.
d. religion often played a role in their beliefs about euthanasia.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following was found in a survey of American physicians being asked about euthanasia?
a. 84% of highly religious physicians supported euthanasia.
b. 69% of those surveyed objected to physician-assisted suicide
c. 12% of highly religious physicians opposed terminal sedation.
d. 41% of those surveyed supported a physician’s right to assist a patient in ending their life.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. A survey of terminally ill patients showed:
a. virtually none supported euthanasia
b. 80% wanted euthanasia for themselves
c. many of them were less likely to consider euthanasia for themselves than for others
d. levels of pain were not important in determining one’s view on euthanasia

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Passive euthanasia:
a. is illegal in all 50 states.
b. is the same thing as physician-assisted suicide.
c. is considered morally wrong by most Americans.
d. involves withholding life-saving treatments  and “allowing” death to occur.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is true regarding euthanasia?
a. Removing someone from life support is a type of passive euthanasia.
b. Euthanasia is another term for terminal sedation.
c. Euthanasia is illegal in all 50 stages.
d. Most physicians support the concept of euthanasia, even those who are very religious.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

 

 

  1. A living will:
a. is typically ignored at most hospitals.
b. was considered unconstitutional in 1990.
c. is a legal document outlining a person’s end-of-life wishes.
d. takes effect as soon as someone enters a hospital.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following statements about a living will is the most accurate?
a. it may reduce the burden on one’s loved ones since one’s wishes when incapacitated are known.
b. it determines how one’s earthy possessions are divided up after one’s death.
c. it provides the information about one’s funeral arrangements to those who are still alive.
d. it is specifically designed to prevent resuscitating treatments, such as CPR, from being administered.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Living wills:
a. may be ignored or unavailable when needed.
b. must be drafted in accordance with federal laws.
c. usually designate an attorney to make decisions for the signer when the signer is incapable of doing so.
d. are more likely to be adhered to by a physician when they give general instructions.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is true of physicians and living wills?
a. physicians always obey the instructions set forth in living wills.
b. physicians may be unable to locate a living will when it is needed.
c. physicians generally all support the practice of euthanasia
d. physicians are legally required to honor the terms of a living will, even of a proxy contests them.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Organ donation
a. is bad for the donor
b. has no risks for the one who may receive one or more organs from donors.
c. is rarely done nowadays.
d. may require lifelong immunosuppressive drugs for the recipient.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Which of the following is true of children’s understanding of death?
a. children typically understand that when they are terminally ill they are going to be gone for good.
b. children understand death in the same way as adults do.
c. children who are terminally ill should not be told they are dying.
d. children understand death more as their understanding of biology increases.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Children’s understanding of death:
a. increases as they get older.
b. is unrelated to their knowledge of biology.
c. becomes progressively less realistic as they get sicker.
d. can only develop after they have lost a very close relatively.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Death of a loved one may affect children:
a. in the same way it affects adults.
b. in no way since they don’t understand death.
c. by compromising their sense of security and safety.
d. by making them act more mature for their age.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Children often react to death of a loved one by:
a. regressing to an earlier stage of development.
b. becoming more secure.
c. acting in more mature ways.
d. asking to go to funeral services.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Around the world, children are taught that death is:
a. permanent. c. something that should be feared.
b. sometimes not permanent. d. the same thing as sleeping.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Death             REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. How can a child be helped to cope with the death of a loved one?
a. Force the child to attend the funeral so s/he can get used to the idea of death.
b. Use phrases such as “Grandpap has gone on a long trip”.
c. Hide the truth from the child.
d. Have the child say a prayer or visit the grave

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

 

 

 

  1. Helping a child cope with the death of a loved one can include:
a. hiding the death of the loved one.
b. letting the child express his/her feelings.
c. ignoring the child’s sleeping or eating problems, knowing that this will pass.
d. expecting them to cut the ties with the dead person.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Research on children’s experiences with death of a loved one has shown that:
a. children will learn to have closure with the death.
b. children will move on with their lives soon after the death occurs.
c. children may maintain a bond with the deceased.
d. children who experience sadness need to be treated with medication.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Adolescents:
a. experience death of a loved one the same as children do.
b. experience death of a loved one the same as adults do.
c. typically experience death more often than younger children do.
d. should be shielded from the death of a loved one since they cannot handle the truth.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. When adolescents experience death of a loved one, they:
a. typically fall apart emotionally.
b. eliminate their risky behavior.
c. deny that death has occurred.
d. may reduce their risky behavior if they see how death applies to them.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Young adults:
a. dwell on how death affects them.
b. see death all around them.
c. are most likely to die from chronic illnesses.
d. usually don’t have to spend much time thinking about their own deaths.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Adults in mid-life:
a. are told not to worry about health screenings, since chronic illness rarely affects them.
b. are unaware that death may affect themselves or those around them.
c. should worry about their risk of developing heart disease or cancer.
d. are more able to deal with the death of a child than adults in later life.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

 

 

  1. During late adulthood:
a. accidents remain the number one leading cause of death.
b. older adults fear death more than illness.
c. older adults may be at great risk for accidents as a result of sensory problems.
d. adults almost universally shed their fear of dying.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Theorists of social and emotional development during late adulthood suggest:
a. older adults are more afraid of death than younger adults.
b. ego transcendence may make facing death easier than in previous times of life.
c. there is one best way of coping with aging.
d. life satisfaction is highest for those who ignore death.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. When someone dies:
a. you should notify the authorities only if there is a reason to suspect that something illegal has happened
b. a doctor needs to sign the death certificate.
c. a funeral director may not remove the body to the funeral home, as this is a job reserved for a mortician
d. there is a legal requirement that the social security administration be informed within 3 days.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. An autopsy is:
a. required whenever someone dies at home.
b. needed to decide whether someone is truly dead or not.
c. usually done without the family’s consent.
d. used to determine the causes and circumstances of a death.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Funeral arrangements:
a. are similar across all cultures
b. have no value except to enrich the funeral director.
c. help provide closure to the grieving family and friends.
d. are the same for people of all religions.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Lisa’s husband, Scott, just died in an unexpected accident. She has an appointment at a funeral home to make arrangements for his funeral service and burial. Which of the following would be the best advice for Lisa?
a. Buy the best casket she can afford, as it shows her love and respect for her husband.
b. Remember that cemeteries often charge for the plot, but do not charge ongoing maintenance fees or for a monument.
c. Take a friend with you to help you avoid making decisions based on emotions.
d. Delay the appointment until you are no longer in mourning.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Funeral arrangements include all but which of the following?
a. whether to cremate or bury the body.
b. how simple or elaborate the ritual will be.
c. whether or not there is to be embalming.
d. revealing the terms of any last will and testament.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Which of the following is an accurate statement regarding funerals?
a. they are often very expensive.
b. they are all run the same way for all families.
c. they always include maintenance fees for the burial plot in the cost.
d. those that are most expensive show the most respect for the deceased person.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. After the death of a loved one:
a. few legal matters arise, since they are taken care of before one’s death.
b. financial arrangements are determined by state law completely.
c. an attorney is rarely needed.
d. grieving can make it difficult to focus on logistical issues, such as expenses and legal matters.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Bereavement is:
a. expressed the same way across different cultures.
b. always less visible than mourning.
c. an emotional state of longing and deprivation following death of a loved one.
d. expected to last for less than a few weeks, or else it is diagnosed as depression.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Grief:
a. the emotional suffering one experiences after a death.
b. lasts six months for almost everyone.
c. probably lasts a lifetime when the loss is a spouse or child.
d. is a public display of bereavement.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Disenfranchised grief is a term used to describe the emotions experienced by:
a. a person who loses a life partner who was not their “spouse.”
b. a person who loses a family member but really does not feel any true emotional reaction to the death.
c. a person who grieves in a way that is unconventional for the society in which they live.
d. a person who actually experiences relief upon the death of a loved one.

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Those who suffer from “disenfranchised grief”:
a. do not have feelings as deep as those who suffer ordinary grief.
b. may feel marginalized by others about their grief.
c. usually have clear expectations about how they should behave.
d. none of the above

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Bowlby’s (1961) theory of grieving:
a. does not include stages of grief.
b. uses the same stages Kübler-Ross did in her theory of dying.
c. .built upon the stages of Kübler-Ross’s model of grieving.
d. relates to one’s responses to different kinds of losses, such as death or divorce.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Which of the following is a stage of grief identified by Bowlby (1961)?
a. shock-numbness c. disorganization-searching
b. yearning-despair d. bargaining-denial

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. The correct order of stages of grief in Bowlby’s theory is:
a. disorganization-despair, reorganization, yearning-searching, shock-numbness
b. reorganization, shock-numbness, yearning-searching, disorganization-despair
c. shock-numbness, yearning-searching, disorganization-despair, reorganization
d. yearning-searching, disorganization-despair, reorganization, shock-numbness

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

 

 

 

  1. Research on grief has shown that:
a. stage theories of grief are not supported.
b. stage theories of grief have some support.
c. while the stages are shown to exist, they occur in a different order than predicted by the theories.
d. the order and timing of grief is always the same for those who grieve.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Examination of stage-theories of grieving conducted by Maciejewski and colleagues (2007) found that the emotion of ________ appears to be the most prominent just after a loss occurs.
a. anger c. yearning
b. disorientation d. disbelief

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Critiques of stage theories of grieving have suggested that;
a. everyone grieves the same way, therefore theories are not needed to show this.
b. the timing of events is the same for everyone, but the order is different than predicted
c. more emotions may be experienced than outlined.
d. cultural mores determine how we grieve, and therefore there is no individual variation in grief reactions.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. In order to cope with the death of a loved one, you should:
a. try to move on as quickly as possible. c. feel guilty for doing things for yourself.
b. remember to take care of yourself. d. try not to think about the loss.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Marilyn’s husband died suddenly from an illness of short duration. Her friends have lots of advice for her. Which of the following should she listen to?
a. Move on to the next stage.
b. Start dating as soon as possible so you won’t have to be alone.
c. Join a bereavement group.
d. Start taking medication immediately.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. When you are trying to help a loved one who is grieving you should:
a. watch what you say, since the wrong thing could plunge them into deeper despair.
b. have all of the answers to the questions the person asks.
c. leave your loved one alone, since that is what most grieving people want and need.
d. talk about the dead person if your loved one wants to.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

 

  1. Anastasia’s father died when he was 90 years old. Which advice should you follow in order to help her?
a. Make her talk about him even if she doesn’t want to.
b. Tell her that he was old and had lived a long, happy life.
c. Offer to help her with errands or just to sit and listen to her reminisce about him.
d. Don’t worry about it. He was old and so she won’t grieve too long for him.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

  1. Research on grief has shown that:
a. disbelief tends to last the longest of all of the emotions following the loved one’s death.
b. few people experience yearning
c. there are no trends in how people experience grief, since it is so individual.
d. disbelief tends to subside over time and acceptance increases.

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. In which of the following countries would you most likely participate in Araw ng mga Patay, or the Day of the Dead?
a. Mexico c. Yemen
b. Indonesia d. The Philippines

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

MATCHING

 

Match the following:

a. Loosely defined as the cessation of life, though there are many different definitions to examine. i. Where most people die in the United States
b. A person in this stage might think “I promise to be a better person if I can just live a while longer” j. A person in this stage might think “It is the wrong diagnosis”
c. Euthanasia carried out with the approval of the dying person k. Euthanasia carried out without the consent of the dying person
d. American culture’s way of dealing with death l. Focuses on the quality of life and providing death with dignity
e. Focuses on pain management m. Medicating someone in the last hours until death to relieve fear and anxiety
f. Stoppage of all brain activity n. Cessation of cortical activity
g. According to Kübler-Ross this is the last stage of dying o. A person in this stage might think ““It’s the doctor’s fault I am dying”
h. An intervention specifically designed to shorten life  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Bargaining

 

  1. Voluntary active euthanasia

 

  1. Acceptance

 

  1. Terminal sedation

 

  1. Death

 

  1. Palliative care

 

  1. Denial

 

  1. A hospital

 

  1. Denial of death

 

  1. Involuntary active euthanasia

 

  1. Whole brain death

 

  1. Hospice

 

  1. Active euthanasia

 

  1. Anger

 

  1. Brain death

 

 

 

 

  1. ANS:  B

 

  1. ANS:  C

 

  1. ANS:  G

 

  1. ANS:  M

 

  1. ANS:  A

 

  1. ANS:  E

 

  1. ANS:  J

 

  1. ANS:  I

 

  1. ANS:  D

 

  1. ANS:  K

 

  1. ANS:  F

 

  1. ANS:  L

 

  1. ANS:  H

 

  1. ANS:  O

 

  1. ANS:  N

 

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. American culture tends to accept death as a part of life.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Whole brain death is the way that death is defined most often in hospitals today.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. When someone’s brain stem and cerebral cortex show flat EEG lines, this is considered “whole brain death.”

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. The stages of death according to Kübler-Ross (1969) are denial, absence, bargaining, depression, and acceptance.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. When someone who is terminally ill believes that a wrong diagnosis was made this person is exhibiting the denial stage of Kübler-Ross (1969).

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

 

 

  1. Kübler-Ross’ (1969) stages of dying apply equally to all who are dying.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Shneidman (1977) explained that people typically change their personalities radically after they are diagnosed with a terminal illness.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-1 Understanding Death and Dying

OBJ:   19-1               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Most people in the United States today die at home.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. More people die in nursing homes than in hospitals today in the U.S.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Hospice care focuses on the quality, not the quantity, of life available to a dying person.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Hospice workers only work with dying patients and leave the care of their families to other professionals.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Palliative care involves treating and curing diseases.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. The emotions and reactions of people who are dying vary from day to day.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-2 Where People Die

OBJ:   19-2               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Euthanasia means “good death”.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Removing life support from a comatose patient is an example of voluntary active euthanasia.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Application

 

 

 

  1. Voluntary active euthanasia remains illegal throughout most of the United States.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Terminal sedation is a method by which death is typically hastened.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Most physicians support the practice of physician-assisted suicide.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Passive euthanasia involves actions which hasten death by means of withholding potentially life-saving treatments.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Difficult         REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Living wills are legal documents that designate where one’s earthly possessions will be placed after one dies.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Living wills that have more specific directions are more often followed than ones with more general directions.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-3 Euthanasia: Is There a Right to Die?

OBJ:   19-3               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Children are likely to understand that someone who dies is not coming back.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Adolescents who experience death of a loved one may still feel invulnerable to death.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Conceptual

 

  1. Young adults typically spend a lot of time dwelling on their own impending deaths.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-4 Life-Span Perspectives on Death

OBJ:   19-4               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Funeral arrangements cannot be made in advance of one’s death.

 

ANS:  F                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

 

  1. Attorneys may be useful to consult after the death of a loved one.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Easy               REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. Bowlby (1961) identified four stages of grief which are shock-numbness, yearning-searching, disorganization-despair, and reorganization.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

  1. People who want to help others cope with death of a loved one should not be afraid of what to say.

 

ANS:  T                    DIF:    Moderate       REF:   19-5 Coping With Death

OBJ:   19-5               MSC:  TYPE: Factual

 

COMPLETION

 

  1. The ________ is deeply embedded in our culture. Many people prefer not to think about it or plan ahead for it, as though thinking about it or planning for it might magically bring it about sooner.

 

ANS:  denial of death

 

  1. Medical authorities generally use ________ as the basis for determining that a person has died.

 

ANS:  brain death

 

  1. ________ involves the cessation of all brain activity, including that which can sustain respiratory and circulatory functions.

 

ANS:  Whole brain death

 

  1. The five stages of dying identified by Kübler-Ross include ________, ________, ________, ________, and ________.

 

ANS:  denial, anger, bargaining, denial, acceptance

 

  1. Carla learns she has a terminal illness and says she would spend more time with her mother if she has a chance to live longer. She is demonstrating the ________ stage of dying identified by Kübler-Ross.

 

ANS:  bargaining

 

  1. Manny just left his doctor’s office where he was told he only has three months to live. Manny figures the doctor must have been reading from the wrong file. Manny is displaying ________, a stage of dying identified by Kübler-Ross.

 

ANS:  denial

 

  1. The key factors that appear to affect the________ of the dying individual include the type and extent of organic cerebral impairment, pain and weakness, the time or phase of the person’s life, the person’s philosophy of life (and death), and prior experiences with crises.

 

ANS:  adjustment

  1. Most people in the U.S. die at ________.

 

ANS:  a hospital

 

  1. ________ provide a homelike atmosphere to help terminally ill patients approach death with a maximum of dignity and extensive control of pain and discomfort.

 

ANS:  Hospices

 

  1. Hospices offer ________, rather than curative treatment.

 

ANS:  palliative care

 

  1. The word ________, literally meaning “good death,” is derived the Greek roots eu (“good”) and thanatos (“death”).

 

ANS:  euthanasia

 

  1. In ________, a lethal treatment (usually a drug) is administered to cause a quick and painless death. Usually a spouse or family member administers it.

 

ANS:  active euthanasia

 

  1. When euthanasia is carried out with the patient’s consent, it is called ________  euthanasia.

 

ANS:  voluntary active

 

  1. Jack Kevorkian, who conducted ________ was also known as “Dr. Death”.

 

ANS:  physician-assisted suicide

 

  1. ________ is the practice of relieving distress in a terminally ill patient in the last hours or days of his or her life, usually by means of a continuous intravenous infusion of a sedative drug.

 

ANS:  Terminal sedation

 

  1. ________ is legal in The Netherlands, but that does not mean that it is undertaken lightly.

 

ANS:  Euthanasia

 

  1. ________ involves actions which hasten death by means of withholding potentially life-saving treatments, such as failing to resuscitate a terminally ill patient who stops breathing, or withdrawing medicine, food, or life-support equipment, such as respirators, from a comatose patient.

 

ANS:  Passive euthanasia

 

  1. A ________specifies the conditions under which the person desires to have life-sustaining treatment withdrawn or withheld.

 

ANS:  living will

 

  1. More than ________of the American public approve of living wills.

 

ANS:  90%

  1. Children often consider death to be ________.

 

ANS:  reversible (not permanent)

 

  1. Death of a loved one strikes at the core of children’s sense of ________, particularly if it’s the death of a parent.

 

ANS:  security and well-being

 

  1. Experiencing death of loved ones challenge the adolescent’s sense of immortality that is connected with the ________, although it may not change their behavior.

 

ANS:  personal fable

 

  1. Theorists of social and emotional development in late adulthood suggest that ________, or concern for the well-being of humankind in general, enables some people to begin to face death with an inner calm

 

ANS:  ego transcendence

 

  1. ________ provide an organized way of responding to death that is tied to religious custom and cultural tradition.

 

ANS:  Funerals

 

  1. ________, an emotional state of longing and deprivation that is characterized by feelings of ________ and a deep sense of loss.

 

ANS:  bereavement, grief

 

  1. ________ is one’s visible way of bereaving which is typically culturally determined.

 

ANS:  Mourning

 

  1. Bowlby (1961) identified four stages of ________; they are shock-numbness, yearning-searching, disorganization-despair, and reorganization.

 

ANS:  grief

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. What are ways that American culture denies death?

 

ANS:  According to Kübler-Ross (1969), American culture denies death by using euphemisms such as “Joe passed on” rather than saying he died. It also denies death by avoiding planning for one’s death or those of others. Americans behave at times in ways that suggest they ignore the possibility of death, such as by having poor eating and other health habits and driving recklessly. Additionally, by sending children away from the home when a death has occurred and by having a dying person taken to the hospital, death becomes more remote or separate from daily life.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. What is death and how is it defined?

 

ANS:  Death is the cessation of life. There are different biological definitions of death, including brain death and whole brain death. Brain death occurs when there is an absence of cortical activity, indicated by a flat EEG. Whole brain death, on the other hand, involves an absence of cortical as well as brain stem activity. The result of this more involved brain inactivity is a lack of one’s ability to engage in respiration or circulation without life-supporting machinery.  Death is also a legal matter, with different states applying different criteria to determine when a person is or is not dead.

 

  1. What are the stages of dying, according to Kübler-Ross (1969)?

 

ANS:  The first stage of dying is denial, in which a person believes that s/he is not actually dying. The second stage is anger, in which the person experiences anger and resentment, possibly towards a higher power or the medical establishment or the turn of events that have led to this situation. Bargaining, the third stage, occurs when a person tries to make a deal, often with a higher authority, to be able to live longer or no longer be terminally ill. Depression is a negative mood that occurs when someone experiences grief and sadness regarding his/her impending death. Acceptance, the last stage of dying, occurs when the dying person is able to accept and understand the impending death. The five stages of the model are sometimes summarized with the term “DABDA.”

 

  1. How have Kübler-Ross’ (1969) stages of dying been criticized by others?

 

ANS:  Some theorists believe that Kübler-Ross emphasized the invariant nature of the stages too much, instead believing that people experience a lot of overlap and repetition of the stages. AlsoRemember,me believed that dying is not stagelike and that different people will experience death in different ways. It is not necessary for someone to reach acceptance. Additionally, these stages were considered to be less relevant to someone who was not old or without a diagnosis of a terminal illness.

 

  1. What is hospice?

 

ANS:  Hospice is a program that works with people with a terminal illness diagnosis and their families. Hospice care relies upon a team of professionals, such as physicians, nursesRemember,cial workers, and religious figures who provide physical and psychological care to the patient and family. The care ranges from palliative care, therapy for improving quality of life, and bereavement counseling. This care may continue from the time of diagnosis through a year past the death of the patient. Hospice also focuses on avoiding the denial of death, and encouraging death with dignity for both the dying person as well as their loved ones.

 

  1. What are ways to help a dying person?

 

ANS:  Show the person you care by talking with him or her and helping with household tasks. Be sensitive to the emotional state of the person, which may change from moment to moment. Do not make assumptions about what to say and what not to say or how to say it. Give of yourself and talk about yourself, sharing your concerns and joys.

 

  1. How do active and passive euthanasia differ?

 

ANS:  Active euthanasia, which includes assisted suicide, involves taking steps to shorten the life of a person. Active euthanasia may include removing life support, administering a lethal dose of drug or supplying a drug for the individual to take, and taking steps with or without the consent of the individual. Passive euthanasia involves not doing something to prolong the life of the individual, such as not administering a life-sustaining treatment.

 

 

  1. What is the purpose of a living will?

 

ANS:  A living will is a legal document created to specify the wishes of a person in the event that she or he is incapacitated at a time when life decisions need to be made. A good living will is one that has very explicit descriptions of the conditions under which decisions should be made and in what manner. A living will often designates another person who would be responsible for decisions in the situation where the person is incapable of making decisions.

 

  1. How do children experience death of a loved one differently from older people?

 

ANS:  Children often do not understand that death is a permanent state. Children may expect that someone is just sleeping and will awake or will return from a long journey. Children do experience grief and may regress or become aggressive after a loved one dies. It is not uncommon for children to deny the situation, although prolonged denial is a sign of a problem. Children may continue to maintain a relationship with a deceased love one or may have closure in the situation. The more information a child has about the biological aspects of death, the more likely she or he is to understand the death in ways similar to older people.

 

  1. How do bereavement, grief, and mourning differ?

 

ANS:  Bereavement is the sense of loss following the death of a loved one. It is the state of deprivation and longing one may feel. Grief, which goes along with bereavement, is the sense of profound sadness that one experiences. Mourning is the public display of grief and is often culturally determined. ThusRemember,meone may wear black, rent her clothes, wail and mark the time since the death in ritual ways, for example.

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