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Health Assessment and Physical Examination 5th Edition Estes Test Bank

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Health Assessment and Physical Examination 5th Edition Estes Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1133610939

ISBN-10: 1133610935

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Health Assessment and Physical Examination 5th Edition Estes Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1133610939

ISBN-10: 1133610935

 

 

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Free Nursing Test Questions:

 

CHAPTER 22: MALE GENITALIA

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which of the following is a function of the seminal vesicles?
a. secreting an alkaline substance that protects sperm
b. secreting fluid that helps provide a source of energy for sperm metabolism
c. secreting the male hormone testosterone
d. providing lubrication at the end of the penis during sexual intercourse

 

 

ANS:  B

The seminal vesicles secrete fluid that helps provide a source of energy for sperm metabolism. They also produce prostaglandins, which contribute to sperm motility and viability.  The bulbourethral (Cowper’s) glands secrete an alkaline substance that protects sperm by neutralizing the acidic environment of the vagina and provides lubrication at the end of the penis during sexual intercourse. Testosterone is not secreted by the seminal vesicles.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   Accessory Organs

 

  1. During the male sexual act, the penis becomes erect when blood fills the corpora cavernosa because of
a. sympathetic nerve impulses.
b. increased levels of prostaglandins and testosterone.
c. flow of semen from the epididymis to the vas deferens.
d. dilation of arterioles and compression of veins.

 

 

ANS:  D

Erection is the first stage of the male sexual act and is achieved through either physical or psychogenic stimulation of sensory nerves in the genital area. Parasympathetic impulses from the sacral portion of the spinal cord cause a vascular effect. The arterioles dilate and blood fills the corpora cavernosa, causing the penis to expand and become rigid. The veins are compressed to occlude venous outflow. The nerve impulses are parasympathetic, not sympathetic. Prostaglandins are produced by the seminal vesicles for the lubrication stage; testosterone is involved in the production of sperm and is responsible for male sexual feelings and performance as well as muscle development. The flow of semen is the third stage of the male sexual act followed closely by the fourth and last stage, ejaculation.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Male Sexual Function

 

  1. Your patient complains of burning on urination and a white-mucoid urethral discharge. Which information is needed to further assess his apparent infection?
a. Have you had a new sexual partner in the past 6 months?
b. Have you recently or have you ever had the mumps?
c. Has anyone in your family had testicular cancer?
d. Have you recently had an accident inducing trauma to your genitalia?

 

 

ANS:  A

Urethral discharge is associated with the following: 1) dysuria, 2) painful ejaculation, 3) fever, 4) change in frequency of urination, 5) pruritus, 6) conjunctivitis, 7) arthritis, 8) dermatological rash, and 9) STD. Issues to explore to further assess the condition include: 1) a new sexual partner in the last 6 months, 2) multiple partners, 3) a partner known to have other partners, and 4) unprotected intercourse.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying

REF:   Health History | Chief Complaint | Urethral Discharge

 

  1. Which of the following is a possible cause of erectile dysfunction (ED)?
a. infertility treatment
b. medications (e.g., beta blockers, antidepressants)
c. high testosterone levels
d. increased libido

 

 

ANS:  B

Erectile dysfunction is classified as an inability to achieve or maintain erection and an inability to ejaculate. This dysfunction can be the result of systemic disease, anxiety, trauma, or a side effect of drugs (particularly beta blockers and antidepressants). Treatment for infertility, high testosterone levels, and increased libido are not possible causes of erectile dysfunction. Infertility treatment is not correlated with ED. Low testosterone levels and diminished libido can be associated with ED.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding

REF:   Health History | Chief Complaint | Erectile Dysfunction

 

  1. Which substance accelerates testosterone metabolism and, over time, can lead to increased levels of estrogens?
a. alcohol c. cocaine
b. amphetamines d. tobacco

 

 

ANS:  A

Alcohol use impairs gonadotropin release and accelerates testosterone metabolism, causing impotence and loss of libido; large doses can acutely depress the sexual reflexes; chronic alcoholism causes high levels of circulating estrogens, which suppress libido. Amphetamines increase libido, can delay orgasm in moderate users, and can result in impotence for chronic users. Cocaine increases sexual excitability, and can result in priapism and eventually impotence. Cigarette smoking increases the risk of atherosclerotic disease, which can decrease penile blood flow.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding

REF:   Health History | Social History

 

  1. You observe two lesions on your patient’s penis. One is a small papular lesion and the other is an ulcer with sharp margins. These are most likely
a. chancres. c. chordee.
b. chancroids. d. tinea cruris lesions.

 

 

ANS:  A

Chancre is the lesion of primary syphilis and is highly infectious. It is described as a small papular lesion that enlarges and undergoes superficial necrosis to produce a sharply marginated ulcer on a clean base. A chancroid is a tender, painful, ulcerated, exudative, papular lesion with an erythematous halo, surrounding edema, and a friable base. Chordee is penile curvature and is not associated with lesions. Tinea cruris lesions are the result of a fungal infection, usually caused by Epidermophyton floccosum or Trichophyton rubrum. Tinea cruris lesions are described as scaling, papular lesions with sharp margins, occasionally clear centers, and pustules.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Inspection | Penis

 

  1. While performing androscopy, you observe tiny white papules, condyloma acuminatum, which are caused by infection with
a. Candida albicans. c. human papillomavirus.
b. Epidermophyton floccosum. d. Trichophyton rubrum.

 

 

ANS:  C

Condyloma acuminatum (genital warts) are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the epithelial cells. Pinhead papules to cauliflower-like groupings of filiform, skin-colored, pink or red lesions are observed. Candida albicans presents with multiple, discrete, flat pustules with slight scaling and surrounding edema. Epidermophyton floccosum is identified by erythematous plaques with scaling, papular lesions with sharp margins, occasionally clear centers, and pustules. Trichophyton rubrum shares the grouping with Epidermophyton floccosum; both produce a fungal infection of the groin, tinea cruris.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying        REF:   Inspection | Penis

 

  1. During your assessment of an uncircumcised male infant, you observe that his foreskin is retracted and the penis is swollen distal to the foreskin. This condition is known as
a. paraphimosis. c. phimosis.
b. Peyronie’s disease. d. priapism.

 

 

ANS:  A

Inability to retract the foreskin is normal in infancy. Should the foreskin be retracted, the foreskin works as a circulatory constrictor, causing decreased blood flow, edema, and potential necrosis, even gangrene. This is called paraphimosis. Peyronie’s disease involves the deposition of hardened, palpable, nontender plaques on the dorsal surface of the erect penis. Phimosis is an unusually long foreskin or one that cannot be retracted over the glans penis. Priapism is a continuous and pathological erection of the penis.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying        REF:   Inspection | Penis

 

  1. Ventral curvature of the penis usually occurs along with epispadias in which the urethral meatus opens
a. at the penoscrotal junction. c. between the scrotal folds.
b. dorsally on the glans penis. d. ventrally on the glans penis.

 

 

ANS:  B

Penile curvature, or chordee, is either a ventral or a dorsal curvature of the penis. Curvature is usually congenitally caused by a fibrous band along the usual course of the corpus spongiosum. Ventral chordee is seen mostly with epispadias, when the urethral meatus opens dorsally on the glans. Hypospadias is a condition in which the urethral meatus opens ventrally on the glans. The urethral meatus does not open at the penoscrotal junction or between the scrotal folds.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Inspection | Penis

 

  1. To prepare your patient for acetowhitening, you apply gauze saturated with which substance to his penis and scrotum?
a. a topical stain c. 70% isopropyl alcohol
b. 5% acetic acid solution d. sterile normal saline

 

 

ANS:  B

The purpose for acetowhitening is to identify warty skin lesions that are not easily seen by the naked eye. It is indicated with a history of warts or HPV, sexual contact with a partner with warts or HPV,  high-risk sexual behavior, or  STD. Using a 10x power magnifying lens, gauze, and a 5% acetic acid solution, wrap the penis and the scrotal area with gauze wrap that has been impregnated with the 5% acetic acid solution for 5 minutes. Topical stain, sterile normal saline, and 70% isopropyl alcohol will not “whiten” the lesions.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying

REF:   Advanced Technique: Acetowhitening: Assessing for HPV

 

  1. The enlargement of the scrotum that occurs with a hydrocele is the result of
a. blocked ductules resulting in sperm-filled cysts.
b. dilated veins of the spermatic cord.
c. accumulation of fluid between the layers of the tunica vaginalis.
d. edema caused by an inguinal hernia.

 

 

ANS:  C

A hydrocele is created by the accumulation of fluid between the two layers of the tunica vaginalis of the scrotum. Hydroceles can be idiopathic or the result of  trauma, inguinal surgery, epididymitis, or testicular tumor. Blockage of the efferent ductules of the rete testis causes formation of sperm-filled cysts called spermatocele. Dilated veins of the spermatic cord cause a varicocele. An inguinal hernia causes a bulge or enlargement in the inguinal area, not in the scrotum.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Inspection | Scrotum

 

  1. In light-skinned individuals, a scrotal mass with a bluish discoloration may be caused by
a. accumulation of fluid in the testis.
b. blockage of the efferent ductules of the rete testis.
c. dilated veins in the pampiniform plexus of the spermatic cord.
d. oily, fatty matter secreted by the sebaceous glands.

 

 

ANS:  C

In light-skinned individuals, a scrotal mass with a bluish discoloration involves dilated veins in the pampiniform plexus of the spermatic cord (varicocele). Accumulation of fluid does not occur in the testis, but in the scrotum (hydrocele). Blockage of the efferent ductiles of the rete testis is the cause for the formation of the spermatocele. A sebaceous cyst contains sebum, an oily, fatty matter secreted by the sebaceous glands or ducts that presents as a round, firm, cystic nodule confined within the scrotal sac.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Inspection | Scrotum

 

  1. You roll a cotton swab saturated with a patient’s penile discharge over a Thayer-Martin plate for a culture in what type of pattern?
a. in a circular pattern from the center of the plate outward
b. from side to side to cover as much of the surface as possible
c. C pattern
d. Z pattern

 

 

ANS:  D

With discharge evident, note the color, consistency, and odor of the discharge. With the nondominant hand, hold the penis. With the dominant hand, roll a sterile cotton swab in the discharge. Place the swab in a Culturette tube. With a second sterile cotton swab, obtain another specimen for a gonorrheal culture. Roll the swab over a Thayer-Martin in a Z pattern. Label both cultures and send them to the laboratory for analysis. Circular pattern, side to side, and C pattern are not indicated.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying

REF:   Advanced Technique: Urethral Culture – Identifying Penile Pathogens

 

  1. The recommended procedure for palpating the testicle is to
a. firmly palpate using the entire palmar surface of one hand.
b. gently palpate using the thumb and first two fingers of one hand.
c. firmly palpate using the first two fingers of each hand.
d. gently palpate using the fingers of both hands.

 

 

ANS:  B

Between the thumb and the first two fingers, gently palpate the testicle. Palpation of the testicle is performed gently, not firmly. The palm, the first two fingers of each hand, and the fingers of both hands are not used.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying        REF:   Palpation | Scrotum

 

  1. Structures that are assessed when palpating both sides of the scrotum include the testicle and
a. epididymis and spermatic cord. c. prostate gland and seminal vesicles.
b. vas deferens and bulbourethral glands. d. urethral meatus.

 

 

ANS:  A

Structures that are assessed when palpating both sides of the scrotum include the testicle, the related epididymis, and spermatic cord. The vas deferens, bulbourethral glands, prostate gland, urethral meatus, and seminal vesicles cannot be palpated.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Palpation | Scrotum

 

  1. Which statement best describes palpation of a varicocele?
a. swollen, painful scrotum c. “bag of worms” mass
b. large, smooth-walled mass d. smallRemember,ft testis

 

 

ANS:  C

Palpation of a scrotal mass superior to the testis that reveals a “bag of worms” indicates a varicocele. A swollen, painful scrotum suggests trauma. A large, smooth-walled mass is descriptive of a hydrocele. A soft testis may indicate hypogonadism.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   Palpation | Scrotum

 

  1. Which condition requires immediate referral for surgical intervention?
a. orchitis c. testicular torsion
b. spermatocele d. cryptorchidism

 

 

ANS:  C

Testicular torsion is a surgical emergency. It causes venous obstruction, secondary edema, and eventual arterial obstruction. Orchitis, acute, painful onset of swelling of the testicle along with warm scrotal skin can be caused by mumps, coxsackievirus B, infectious mononucleosis, and varicella. Spermatocele involves sperm-filled cysts at the top of the testis or in the epididymis. Cryptorchidism describes one or both testes that are undescended.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Palpation | Scrotum

 

  1. Palpation of a patient’s scrotum reveals a normal testicle on the right, but the left testicle cannot be palpated. You suspect that he has cryptorchidism and
a. ask him about recent trauma to his scrotum.
b. ask him about recent viral infections such as mumps.
c. palpate his left inguinal canal to locate the testicle.
d. prepare him for emergency surgery.

 

 

ANS:  C

The causes of cryptorchidism are not established but may be multiple. The undescended testis is usually smaller than its normally descended mate. Unilateral cryptorchidism is more common than bilateral. The undescended testicle is usually located in the inguinal canal or less commonly intra-abdominally. Palpate his left inguinal canal. Trauma might not be involved; it is more likely a congenital condition. Mumps or viral infections do not cause cryptorchidism. Emergency surgery is not required.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying        REF:   Palpation | Scrotum

 

  1. Your patient complains of sudden onset of swelling and pain in his scrotum. Assessment reveals a swollen scrotum with reddened skin that is taut with pitting. These findings most likely indicate
a. cryptorchidism.
b. epididymitis from gonorrhea.
c. orchitis caused by a bacterial infection.
d. scrotal edema from trauma with possible testicular rupture.

 

 

ANS:  D

Scrotal edema accompanies edema associated with the lower half of the body, such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and portal vein obstruction. It can also be the result of local inflammation. Trauma is a major cause of acute scrotal swelling. Scrotal or testicular hematoma formation, as well as testicular rupture, may be present. Cryptorchidism involves undescended testicles. Epididymitis from gonorrhea presents as a scrotum that appears indurated, swollen, and tender, without sudden onset. Orchitis presents as an acute, painful onset of swelling to the testicle along with warm scrotal skin, described as “heaviness in the scrotum.” It is an infectious process, without sudden onset.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Palpation | Scrotum

 

  1. Which of the following are signs of testicular cancer?
a. hard, fixed, palpable nodule on the testicle
b. indurated, swollen, and tender testicle
c. soft, movable mass on the testicle
d. small testicle with scrotal edema

 

 

ANS:  A

Testicular cancer should be suspected if a hard, fixed nodule is palpated. Gonorrhea should be suspected in the presence of indurated, swollen, and tender testicles. A soft, movable mass is the opposite of the hard, fixed nodular mass suspected of testicular cancer. A small testicle with scrotal edema is not indicative of testicular cancer.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding                                 REF:   Palpation | Scrotum

 

  1. The nurse would teach a 21-year-old patient, that the best time to perform a testicular self- examination is
a. early in the morning when relaxed.
b. after ejaculation, when semen levels are depleted.
c. after a warm shower when the hands and scrotum are warm.
d. before exercising so that blood vessels are not enlarged.

 

 

ANS:  C

Tell the patient to pick a date to perform the exam every month. The best time to perform the examination is after a warm shower when both hands and the scrotum are warm. The key is the warm shower and warm hands; the hands are often cold early in the morning. Ejaculation is not required to perform self-examination, nor is exercising.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying

REF:   Nursing Tip: Teaching Testicular Self-Examination

 

  1. A red glow appears when your patient undergoes transillumination of his scrotum. Which of the following is most likely to cause this effect?
a. inguinal hernia c. normal testicle
b. hydrocele d. tumor

 

 

ANS:  B

The transmission of a red glow indicates serous fluid within the scrotal sac (indicating either hydrocele or spermatocele). A normal testicle, a hernia, and a tumor (vascular structures) do not transilluminate (there is no red glow).

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Analyzing

REF:   Advanced Technique: Transillumination of the Scrotum – Assessing for Scrotal Mass

 

  1. To palpate for a hernia at the external inguinal ring, you should insert your right index finger into the patient’s scrotal sac
a. above the right testicle. c. below the right testicle.
b. above the left testicle. d. below the left testicle.

 

 

ANS:  A

First, palpate the skin overlying the inguinal and femoral areas for lymph nodes. Ask the patient to bear down while you palpate the inguinal area. Place the right index finger in the patient’s right scrotal sac above the right testicle and invaginate the scrotal skin. Follow the spermatic cord until you reach a triangular, slitlike opening (the external inguinal ring). Repeat on the left side, first above the right testicle, then above the left testicle, but never below.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying        REF:   Palpation | Inguinal Area

 

  1. Your 20-year-old patient states that he has noticed a bulging in his groin recently. Palpation reveals a painless mass at his left external inguinal ring that protrudes into the scrotum with straining. Bowel sounds are auscultated in the scrotum. This mass is most likely a(n)
a. direct inguinal hernia. c. femoral hernia.
b. grossly enlarged inguinal lymph node. d. indirect inguinal hernia.

 

 

ANS:  D

Neither direct inguinal hernias or femoral hernias produce bowel sounds. Hence, the hernia is an indirect inguinal hernia. A grossly enlarged inguinal lymph node will not produce bowel sounds.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Analyzing      REF:   Auscultation | Scrotum

 

  1. Which patient would be at the highest risk for developing penile cancer?
a. 30-year-old sexually active circumcised male with a history of HPV type 15
b. 75-year-old sexually active circumcised male
c. 40-year-old uncircumcised male who is not sexually active
d. 55-year-old sexually active uncircumcised male

 

 

ANS:  D

Risk factors for penile cancer include: 1) 50 to 70 years of age, 2) intact foreskin, 3) poor hygiene, 4) history of HPV types 16 and 18. Therefore, the 55-year-old sexually active uncircumcised male is at highest t risk for developing penile cancer because of his age and being uncircumcised. The 30-year-old does not belong to the appropriate age group for highest risk. Additionally, because he is circumcised and has HPV type 15, not 16 or 18, these factors put him at a lower risk. The 75-year-old is at risk because of his age, but he is circumcised which lowers his risk. The 40-year-old has no risk factors.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Analyzing      REF:   Risk Factors: Penile Cancer

 

  1. During the testicular exam, you palpate a unilateral mass in the scrotum. You are unable to palpate the entire testicle. What is the first thing you should do?
a. Refer the patient to a surgeon.
b. Obtain a testicular sonogram.
c. Obtain a urethral culture and treat for infection.
d. Attempt to transilluminate the mass.

 

 

ANS:  D

If a scrotal mass or enlargement is detected, the first thing you should do is to transilluminate  the scrotum. There will be no red glow if the testicle is normal. The transmission of a red glow indicates a serous fluid within the scrotal sac and may be indicative of a hydrocele or a spermatocele. Referring the patient to a surgeon, obtaining a testicular sonogram, and obtaining a urethral culture and treating for infection are not the first priority actions.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Analyzing

REF:   Advanced Technique: Transillumination of the Scrotum –  Assessing for Scrotal Mass

 

  1. Multiple piercings up the penile shaft is known as which of the following?
a. Prince Albert c. dydoe
b. frenum ladder d. ampallang

 

 

ANS:  B

Multiple piercings up the penile shaft is known as frenum ladder.  The Prince Albert is one of the more popular types of genital piercings. The jewelry is inserted through the urethral meatus and exits through the base of the frenulum (the elastic band of tissue on the underside of the glans penis that connects the foreskin to the glans). Dydoe is lateral piercing of the glans penis and Ampallang is horizontal piercing of the glans penis above the urethra.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding

REF:   Nursing Alert: Male Genital Piercing

 

  1. The most common complications of genital piercing are which of the following?
a. infection and bleeding c. site hypersensitivity and bleeding
b. sensitivity and urethral tears d. change in urine stream and difficulty aiming

 

 

ANS:  A

The most common complications of genital piercing are infection and bleeding. The Prince Albert piercing creates a fistula for urine to drain and men may need to sit down to void due to the change in urine stream and difficulty aiming. Site hypersensitivity is another problem commonly reported by men. Additional complications include urethral tears, paraphimosis, and post-coital bleeding. Sexual partners report painful sex, bleeding, and sensitivity reactions from the jewelry.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Nursing Alert: Male Genital Piercing

 

  1. The FDA licensed the HPV vaccine, HPV4, for use in males aged 9 through 26 years for prevention of which of the following?
a. herpes c. testicular cancer
b. genital warts d. condyloma acuminatum

 

 

ANS:  B

In 2009, the FDA licensed the HPV vaccine, HPV4, for use in males aged 9 through 26 years for prevention of genital warts.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   HPV Vaccination

 

  1. Your patient complains of a discharge from his urethra each morning, yet none is present now. To obtain a specimen of the discharge for culture, you should ask your patient to
a. take the culture tube home to obtain a specimen the next morning.
b. provide a clean-catch urine specimen for culture.
c. milk his penis from the shaft to the glans.
d. squeeze his glans penis to express a discharge.

 

 

ANS:  C

If the patient complains of penile discharge but none is present, ask the patient to milk the penis from the shaft to the glans. This maneuver may express a discharge that can then be cultured. Asking the patient to take the culture tube home to obtain a specimen the next morning may not be effective unless he is told about “milking” the penis. Providing a clean-catch urine specimen for culture is inappropriate because a urine specimen is not required. What is needed is a specimen of the drainage from the urethra. Squeezing the glans penis is not the correct method to obtain a discharge from the urethra.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Applying        REF:   Inspection | Urethral Meatus

 

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

 

  1. Which of the following are predisposing factors for Candida? Select all that apply.
a. Tight clothing d. Deficient immune system
b. Moisture e. Antibiotic therapy
c. Obesity f. Anemia

 

 

ANS:  B, D, E

Candida is a superficial mycotic infection of moist cutaneous sites. Predisposing factors include moisture, diabetes mellitus, antibiotic therapy, and deficiencies in systemic immunity.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   Inspection: Penis

 

  1. Which of the following can cause orchitis, an inflammation of the testis? Select all that apply.
a. Atrophy d. Infectious mononucleosis
b. Mumps e. Coxsackievirus B
c. Diabetes mellitus f. Varicella.

 

 

ANS:  B, D, E, F

Orchitis can be caused by mumps, coxsackievirus B, infectious mononucleosis, and varicella.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   Palpation: Scrotum

 

  1. A nursing instructor asks a group of students, “What are some of the complications from male genital piercings?”  Which responses by the students would indicate that further study is necessary? Select all that apply.
a. Bleeding d. Paraphimosis
b. Hypertension e. Urethral tears
c. Hypersensitivity f. Urinary incontinence

 

 

ANS:  A, C, D, E

The instructor would know that the students need further study if they responded hypertension and urinary incontinence.  The most common complications of genital piercing are infection, bleeding, hypersensitivity, changes in urine stream and difficulty aiming. Other complications include urethral tears, paraphimosis, and post-coital bleeding. Sexual partners report painful sex, bleeding, and sensitivity reactions from the jewelry.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Analyzing      REF:   Nursing Alert: Male Genital Piercing

 

  1. Which of the following are risk factors for testicular cancer?  Select all that apply.
a. Family history
b. HIV infection
c. African American men
d. History of cryptorchidism
e. Carcinoma in situ of testicles
f. Most common in men between the ages of 20 and 54

 

 

ANS:  A, B, D, E, F

Risk factors for testicular cancer include family history, HIV infection, history of cryptorchidism, and carcinoma in situ of testicles. Caucasian men (not African American men) between the ages of 20 and 54 are more at risk for this disease.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding

REF:   Nursing Alert: Testicular Cancer Risk Factors

 

  1. Which of the following are characteristics of a femoral hernia?  Select all that apply.
a. More common in infants d. Firm or rubbery lump in groin
b. More common in women e. Associated with cough or crying
c. More common in elderly males f. Pain may be severe

 

 

ANS:  B, D, F

Femoral hernias are more common in women.  They have a firm or rubbery lump in the groin and may cause severe pain. Indirect inguinal hernias are more common in infants and associated with cough or crying.  Direct inguinal hernias are more common in elderly males.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Understanding

REF:   Table 22-2: Comparison of Inguinal and Femoral Hernias

 

COMPLETION

 

  1. The pouchlike structure supporting the testes is called the ____________________.

 

ANS:

scrotum

Rationale: The scrotum is a pouchlike supporting structure for the testes and consists or rugated, deeply pigmented, loose skin.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   Supporting Structures

 

  1. The testicles are suspended by the ____________________.

 

ANS:

spermatic cord

Rationale: The testicles are suspended by the spermatic cord.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   Supporting Structures

 

  1. Sperm production occurs at approximately age ____________________.

 

ANS:

13

thirteen

Rationale: The testes prepare for sperm production at approximately 13 years of age.

 

PTS:   1                    DIF:    Remembering                                 REF:   Spermatogenesis

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