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Illustrated Dental Embryology Histology 4th Edition Fehrenbach Popowics Test Bank

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Illustrated Dental Embryology Histology 4th Edition Fehrenbach Popowics Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1455776856

ISBN-10: 1455776858

 

 

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Illustrated Dental Embryology Histology 4th Edition Fehrenbach Popowics Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1455776856

ISBN-10: 1455776858

 

 

 

 

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Free Nursing Test Questions:

Chapter 15: Overview of Dentitions

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The cementoenamel junction tooth is located at the border of the ____ third of the root.
a. horizontal
b. middle
c. cervical
d. apical

 

 

ANS:  C

The enamel of the crown and cementum of the root usually meet close to the cementoenamel junction, an external line at the neck or cervix of the tooth. A root surface can be divided horizontally into three parts, or thirds, to designate specific tooth areas. Thus, the cementoenamel junction is located at the border of the cervical third of the root.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Anatomy Terms, Page 199

 

  1. The period of time that occurs between 6 and 12 years of age is the ____ dentition period.
a. mixed
b. primary
c. permanent
d. secondary

 

 

ANS:  A

The mixed dentition period follows the primary dentition period. This period occurs between approximately 6 and 12 years of age. Both primary and permanent teeth are present during this transitional stage. The primary dentition period occurs between approximately 6 months and 6 years of age. The permanent dentition period begins approximately after 12 years of age.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Mixed Dentition Period, Page 195

 

  1. When comparing the arches of the two dentitions, one arch of the primary dentition usually contains:
a. two more incisors.
b. four more total teeth.
c. four fewer molars.
d. six fewer total teeth.

 

 

ANS:  D

When comparing the arches of the two dentitions, one arch of the primary dentition usually contains six fewer total teeth. Tooth types of both arches within the primary dentition include 8 incisors, 4 canines, and 8 molars, for a total of 20 teeth. Tooth types of both arches within the permanent dentition include 8 incisors, 4 canines, 8 premolars, and 12 molars, for a total of 32 teeth.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Types, Page 193

 

  1. Which part of the tooth is covered by enamel and remains constant even if the patient undergoes gingival recession?
a. Anatomical crown
b. Clinical crown
c. Anatomical root
d. Clinical root

 

 

ANS:  A

The anatomical crown is the part covered by enamel. It remains mostly constant throughout the life of the tooth, except for attrition and other physical wear. The clinical crown is that part of the anatomical crown that is visible and not covered by the gingiva. Its height is determined by the location of the marginal gingiva. The clinical crown of a tooth can change over time, especially with gingival recession as the marginal gingiva recedes toward the root. The anatomical root is that part of the root covered by cementum. The clinical root of a tooth is that part of the anatomical root that is visible and subject to variability over time, again related to gingival recession.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Anatomy Terms, Page 199

 

  1. Which of the following divides each dental arch into quadrants?
a. Cervical line
b. Midline
c. Line angle
d. Point angle

 

 

ANS:  B

Each dental arch has a midline, an imaginary vertical plane that divides the arch into two approximately equal halves, a right and a left. Thus, each dental arch can be further divided into two quadrants, with four quadrants in the entire oral cavity.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, General Dental Terms, Page 197

 

  1. Which of the following statements is correct when discussing the proximal height of contour of a tooth?
a. Located on the facial and lingual surfaces
b. Usually located at the contact area
c. Area of least contour on a tooth surface
d. Also considered the cementoenamel junction

 

 

ANS:  B

The contact areas on the mesial and distal surfaces are usually also considered the locations of the height of contour on the proximal surfaces when in ideal alignment. Thus, the proximal height of contour is the greatest elevation of the crown either incisocervically or occlusocervically on a specific surface of the crown when viewing its profile from the labial/buccal and the lingual. The crown also has a facial or lingual height of contour that is easily seen when viewing the crown’s profile from the mesial and the distal.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Orientational Tooth Terms, Page 201

 

  1. An older dental term for primary teeth is the _____ dentition.
a. succedaneous
b. second
c. deciduous
d. mixed

 

 

ANS:  C

An older term for the primary dentition is the deciduous dentition. This term is derived from the concept that the primary dentition is shed and replaced entirely by the permanent dentition. Thus, the permanent dentition is the second dentition to develop. The permanent dentition is also sometimes considered the secondary dentition. The permanent dentition is also sometimes considered the succedaneous dentition because most of these permanent teeth succeed primary predecessors. The mixed dentition period follows the primary dentition period. Both primary and permanent teeth are present during this transitional stage.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, The Dentitions, Page 193

 

  1. Which of the following characteristics is noted in a patient during the primary dentition period as compared with the permanent dentition period?
a. Larger overall crowns
b. Lighter enamel color
c. Longer roots
d. Greater number of teeth

 

 

ANS:  B

The differences are noted during the mixed dentition period. The primary crowns are lighter in color than the darker permanent crowns owing to the fact that the permanent teeth having less opaque enamel, and thus the underlying yellow dentin is more visible. Also more evident is the difference in the crown size and root length between the smaller and shorter primary teeth and the larger and longer permanent teeth. The jaws undergo the fastest and most noticeable growth during this period, consistent with the onset of puberty, to accommodate the larger size and number of the adult teeth.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Mixed Dentition Period, Page 195

 

  1. Which of the following terms describes an area of the crown where three surfaces join?
a. Proximal surface
b. Height of contour
c. Line angle
d. Point angle

 

 

ANS:  D

The junction of three surfaces of the crown, the point angle, takes its name from those three surfaces. Each tooth has four point angles. Both the mesial and the distal surfaces between adjacent teeth are considered the proximal surface. Thus, the height of contour is the greatest elevation of the crown. A line angle is formed by the lines that are created at the junction of two crown surfaces.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Orientational Tooth Terms, Page 202

 

  1. The tooth surface that is toward the midline of the oral cavity is the:
a. distal.
b. mesial.
c. lingual.
d. buccal.

 

 

ANS:  B

The surface closest to the midline is considered the mesial surface; the surface farthest away from the midline is considered the distal surface. The facial tooth surfaces closest to the inner cheek are considered the buccal surface. The tooth surface closest to the tongue is termed the lingual surface.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Orientational Tooth Terms, Page 200

 

  1. Which tooth designation system is most commonly used during orthodontic therapy?
a. Palmer Notation Method
b. Universal Tooth Designation System
c. International Standards Organization Designation System
d. Either the Palmer or Universal systems

 

 

ANS:  A

The system that is most commonly used in orthodontic therapy is the Palmer Notation Method. The Universal Tooth Designation System is the most widely used in United States for the designation of both dentitions because it is adaptable to electronic data transfer. The need for a system that can be used internationally, as well as by electronic data transfer, has been recognized, which is why the World Health Organization accepts the International Standards Organization Designation System.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Designation, Page 194

 

  1. The division of each dental arch into three parts is based on the relationship to the:
a. midline.
b. most posterior tooth.
c. tongue.
d. lips.

 

 

ANS:  A

Sextants divide each dental arch into three parts according to the relationship to the midline: right posterior sextant, anterior sextant, and left posterior sextant.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, General Dental Terms, Page 197

 

  1. Which of the following surfaces of a tooth are not difficult to access during dental procedures as well as home care?
a. Facial or lingual surfaces
b. Line angles
c. Proximal surfaces
d. Interproximal space

 

 

ANS:  A

It is more difficult to gain access to the proximal surfaces and the interproximal space than it is to gain access to facial and lingual surfaces, although line angles can also present problems. This access problem occurs for the patient during home care, as well as for the clinician during dental procedures.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Clinical Considerations for Tooth Surfaces, Page 203

 

  1. How do the incisors function during mastication?
a. Piercing and tearing food
b. Assisting canines with food
c. Biting and cutting food
d. Grinding food

 

 

ANS:  C

The incisors function as instruments for biting and cutting food during mastication. The premolars, which are found only in the permanent dentition, assist the canines in piercing and tearing food. The molars function in grinding food during mastication.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Form, Page 203

 

  1. How do the molars function during mastication?
a. Piercing and tearing food
b. Assisting canines with food
c. Biting and cutting food
d. Grinding food

 

 

ANS:  D

The molars function in grinding food during mastication. The premolars, which are found only in the permanent dentition, assist the canines in piercing and tearing food. The incisors function as instruments for biting and cutting food during mastication.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Form, Page 203

 

  1. Which are considered transitional teeth in the permanent dentition?
a. Incisors
b. Canines
c. First molars
d. Second molars

 

 

ANS:  B

Morphologically, canines can be considered transitional teeth between incisors and premolars in the permanent dentition. Similar to the incisors, the crowns of canines are triangular from mesial and distal views, as are all anteriors, but are pentagonal (or five sided) from labial or lingual views.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Form, Page 203

 

  1. When two teeth in the same arch come into contact, the curvatures next to the contact areas form spaces considered:
a. line angles.
b. point angles.
c. height of contours.
d. embrasures.

 

 

ANS:  D

When two teeth in the same arch come into contact, the curvatures next to the contact areas form spaces considered embrasures. A line angle is formed by the lines that are created at the junction of two crown surfaces. The point angle is the junction of three surfaces of the crown. The contact areas on the mesial and distal surfaces are usually also considered the location of the height of contour.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Orientational Tooth Terms, Page 201

 

  1. Which of the following is considered a masticatory surface on a tooth?
a. Lingual surface
b. Palatal surface
c. Incisive surface
d. Buccal surface

 

 

ANS:  C

The masticatory surface is the chewing surface on the most superior surface of the crown. This is the incisal surface for anterior teeth and the occlusal surface for posterior teeth. The tooth surface closest to the tongue is termed the lingual surface. The lingual surfaces closest to the palate on the maxillary arch are sometimes also termed the palatal surface. The facial tooth surfaces closest to the inner cheek are considered the buccal surface.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Orientational Tooth Terms, Page 200

 

  1. What are the linear elevations located on the masticatory surfaces of both anterior and posterior teeth?
a. Root concavities
b. Ridges
c. Cusps
d. Embrasures

 

 

ANS:  B

The masticatory surfaces of both anterior and posterior teeth have linear elevations, or ridges. Many surfaces of the roots have depressions, or root concavities. The masticatory surfaces of both canines and posterior teeth also have at least one major elevation, the cusp. When two teeth in the same arch come into contact, the curvatures next to the contact areas form spaces considered embrasures.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Anatomy Terms, Page 200

 

  1. Which of the following is an imaginary line representing the long axis of a tooth?
a. Midline
b. Ridge
c. Root axis line
d. Sextant

 

 

ANS:  C

The root axis line is an imaginary line representing the long axis of a tooth, drawn in a way to bisect the root. Each dental arch has a midline, an imaginary vertical plane that divides the arch into two approximately equal halves, a right and a left. The masticatory surfaces of both anterior and posterior teeth have linear elevations, or ridges. Sextants divide each dental arch into three parts according to the relationship to the midline.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Anatomy Terms, Page 199

 

  1. Which of the following is the tooth designation system that uses the digits 1 through 32?
a. Universal Numbering System
b. Palmer Notation Method
c. International Numbering System
d. Military Tooth Numbering System

 

 

ANS:  A

The Universal Numbering System designates the permanent teeth from each other in consecutive arrangement as the patient is observed from in front by using the digits 1 through 32. With the Palmer Notation Method, which is also called the Military Tooth Numbering System, the teeth are designated from each other with a right-angle symbol indicating the quadrants, with the tooth number placed inside With the International Numbering System, the digits 1 through 4 are used for quadrants in a clockwise manner in the permanent dentition.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Tooth Designation, Page 193-194

 

  1. Which of the following teeth is the first permanent tooth to erupt into the oral cavity, usually signaling the end of the primary dentition period?
a. Maxillary central incisor
b. Mandibular central incisor
c. Maxillary first molar
d. Mandibular first molar

 

 

ANS:  D

The primary dentition period usually ends when the first permanent tooth erupts, the permanent mandibular first molar.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Primary Dentition Period, Page 195

 

  1. Which of the following usually signals the end of the mixed dentition period?
a. Eruption of first primary tooth
b. Eruption of first permanent tooth
c. Shedding of first primary tooth
d. Shedding of last primary tooth

 

 

ANS:  D

The mixed dentition period usually ends with shedding of the last primary tooth.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Mixed Dentition Period, Page 195

 

  1. During which dentition period may home care become difficult due to crowding that promotes dental biofilm retention?
a. Primary dentition period
b. Mixed dentition period
c. Permanent dentition period
d. Both primary and permanent dentition periods

 

 

ANS:  B

Home care may be difficult for patients during the mixed dentition period because of changes, such as crowding, that may promote dental biofilm retention.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, Clinical Considerations for Dentition Periods, Page 197

 

  1. Which term is used to describe the method by which the teeth of the mandibular arch come into contact with those of the maxillary arch?
a. Embrasures
b. Occlusion
c. Palmer Notation Method
d. Ridges or cusps

 

 

ANS:  B

Occlusion is the method by which the teeth of the mandibular arch come into contact with those of the maxillary arch. When two teeth in the same arch come into contact, the curvatures next to the contact areas form spaces considered embrasures. The Palmer Notation Method is a tooth designation system that has a graphical image. The masticatory surfaces of both anterior and posterior teeth have linear elevations, or ridges. The masticatory surfaces of both canines and posterior teeth also have at least one major elevation, the cusp.

 

REF:   Chapter 15, General Dental Terms, Page 197

 

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