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Leading and Managing in Canadian Nursing 1st Edition Yoder-Wise Grant Test Bank

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Leading and Managing in Canadian Nursing 1st Edition Yoder-Wise Grant Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1926648613

ISBN-10: 1926648617

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Leading and Managing in Canadian Nursing 1st Edition Yoder-Wise Grant Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1926648613

ISBN-10: 1926648617

 

 

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Free Nursing Test Questions:

 

Chapter 27: Role Transition

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The unit leader on an inpatient psychiatric unit of a large hospital has been in the position for 3 months. The unit leader is frustrated by how little time is available to work with patients and how few changes have been implemented in that time. The phase of role transition being experienced is the role of
a. acceptance.
b. negotiation.
c. discrepancy.
d. internalization.

 

 

ANS:  C

Role discrepancy is an experience that includes a gap between what is expected and what is occurring and can lead to disillusionment, discomfort, and frustration. If the unit manager values the relationship and sees the differences between performance and expectations as correctable, then the manager is likely to stay in the role.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 506

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. An interviewee for a nurse manager position asks for a copy of the organizational chart. Organizational charts provide information about the role component of
a. expectations.
b. opportunities.
c. responsibilities.
d. lines of communication.

 

 

ANS:  D

Organizational charts provide information about relationships and lines of communication in the organization.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 504

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. Sue, a newly graduated registered nurse, has been on the orthopedic unit for about 6 months and is reconciling discrepancies between what she thought her role was in relation to peer performance appraisal and what it actually is. This is an example of role
a. discrepancy.
b. ambiguity.
c. integration.
d. stabilization.

 

 

ANS:  C

During role integration, individuals’ perceptions about their roles are undergoing significant adjustments, and they are reconciling discrepancies between what they understood the role to be and what it is.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 506

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. The head nurse and the administrator of a cardiac telemetry unit disagree on how much time the head nurse should allot to various aspects of the role. Staff members on the unit complain that the head nurse is unavailable for clinical concerns because of being off the unit while attending meetings. To facilitate the process of role transition, the head nurse should
a. rely on his or her internal resources.
b. attend a workshop on how to deal with difficult people.
c. develop a relationship with a mentor who has overcome similar difficulties.
d. schedule a series of meetings with staff and the administrator to clarify expectations.

 

 

ANS:  D

During role transition, it is important to clarify expectations to reduce or ameliorate role ambiguity and role strain. Finding out in advance what the explicit and implicit expectations are of the people with whom you are working can facilitate a smoother role transition by decreasing role ambiguity.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   REF:   Page 505

TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

 

  1. A nurse manager in one hospital is a mentee of a colleague who is a few years older and has more experience in nursing management. The colleague works in another hospital, but they meet for lunch once a week. In these meetings, they share their feelings about nursing management and their lives. They have decided to conduct a performance appraisal after the nurse manager has been in the new role for 1 year. The function of a mentor that is missing in the relationship is
a. non-workplace connection.
b. role modelling.
c. professional trajectory assessment.
d. annual performance appraisal.

 

 

ANS:  C

The example demonstrates non-workplace connection on a weekly basis and role modelling. It does not indicate a professional trajectory assessment, which is part of the role of the mentor. Performance appraisals should be ongoing in the early stages of a mentor-mentee relationship.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze                REF:   Page 510

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. The new nurse manager feels torn by the expectations of staff, the demands of hospital administrators, and family obligations. According to Hardy (1978), unrelieved role stress and strain will lead to
a. frustration and anger.
b. alienation of family and friends.
c. low productivity and performance.
d. physical symptoms and acute illness.

 

 

ANS:  C

Unrelieved role stress and strain leads to focusing energy into negative thoughts and feelings, which can leave the manager fatigued and, therefore, less likely to be productive or to perform well.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 505, Theory Box

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. The nurse manager of a unit was demoted to staff nurse 6 months ago. Because of being near retirement, the former nurse manager wanted to be employed at the hospital and was offered a position on the same unit. The former nurse manager complains often about how infrequently the current nurse manager is available on the unit and argues with physicians and co-workers. Patients have complained about the attitude of the former nurse manager. The behaviour of the former nurse manager can be best explained as being caused by
a. overwork in the staff nurse position.
b. inadequate mentoring in the new role.
c. anger as a stage of the grieving process.
d. demotion as a threat to personal identity.

 

 

ANS:  C

When an employment relationship ends or changes unexpectedly, grieving occurs. One of the phases in grieving is anger.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 506

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. A nurse is interviewing for a manager’s position. Which of the following actions is considered a role preview?
a. Formal commitment of the employment contract
b. Improving role performance
c. Touring the unit
d. Disillusionment about the expectations of the job

 

 

ANS:  C

Touring the unit enables the candidate to assess further whether this organization will assist in growth and also to make a positive impression on the potential employer.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   REF:   Page 504

TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

 

  1. The chief nursing officer develops a mentoring program to help new staff members adjust to their new jobs. The main purpose of mentoring is
a. promoting staff retention.
b. promoting staff attrition.
c. developing new role expectations.
d. promoting staff supervision.

 

 

ANS:  A

Mentoring has been identified as important for staff retention.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 509

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. A nurse manager notices that Nathan, a registered nurse (RN) who has been on the unit for approximately 3 years, has a particular interest in technology and seems to be very enthusiastic about working with software and hardware at home. She speaks with Nathan and asks him if he would lead investigation of software applications on the unit. This is an example of
a. opportunity.
b. delegation.
c. role negotiation.
d. role transition.

 

 

ANS:  A

Nathan’s nurse manager recognizes Nathan’s interest in technology as an opportunity for the unit and as a resource that can be used to meet unit goals.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   REF:   Page 504

TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

 

  1. Samia is a nursing graduate with 5 years of experience who is very confident in her clinical skills. She has taken some certificate courses in leadership and management and has considered beginning a graduate degree with this focus. She is excited about being able to use her knowledge and interest by being hired as a nurse manager. Before beginning her new position, Samia spends time with her nurse executive to clarify the executive’s expectations of her and of the unit that she has been hired to manage. Samia’s actions are important in avoiding role
a. ambiguity.
b. transition.
c. development.
d. negotiation.

 

 

ANS:  A

Clarification of implicit and explicit expectations regarding the role assists in avoiding role ambiguity and role strain.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 505

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. After beginning her new position, Samia spends a great deal of time in direct patient care. Her staff begin to complain that they are never able to find her when they need her and that some aspects of her responsibilities fall behind, such as scheduling. Samia is probably
a. lacking an understanding of the nurse management role.
b. attempting to prove her clinical skills to the nursing staff.
c. experiencing difficulty in unlearning old roles.
d. lacking enjoyment in her new role.

 

 

ANS:  C

Although any of the answers listed might be correct, Samia’s confidence in her clinical skills suggests that she is having difficulty unlearning her role as a clinician.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze                REF:   Page 506

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. A strategy that may help Samia make the transition to her management role and to respond to relationships and situations in her new position is
a. avoiding discussion of her personal beliefs with staff until she is ready to do so.
b. finding a network of clinicians with similar interests to her own.
c. researching clinical literature to maintain her clinical assessment skills for the unit.
d. recognizing her strong commitment to care in the management process through journalling.

 

 

ANS:  D

During the transition period, it is important to recognize, use, and strengthen values and beliefs; translate these for staff; and adapt behaviours to the situation. Understanding personal and professional beliefs and values assists in helping the manager respond to situations and relationships.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 507 | Page 512

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. Samia finds that she has begun to think negatively about the way nursing care is delivered on her nursing unit. She often wishes that she were back on her old unit and in her familiar staff nurse role. This behaviour
a. is natural when a new position is assumed.
b. diverts energy from internalization of Samia’s new role.
c. is justified if practices are deficient on the new unit.
d. reflects Samia’s astuteness as a clinician.

 

 

ANS:  B

By focusing on the weaknesses of the unit, Samia may lack the energy to internalize the new role—a step that is critical to being an effective leader. As a new manager, Samia must learn how to access resources in the organization. Approaching the organization as a foreign culture, Samia can keenly observe the rituals, accepted practices, and patterns of communication within the organization. This ongoing assessment promotes a speedier transition into the role of manager.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 508

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. Samia finds a mentor, Amy, who has been in the role of unit manager for 3 years and has a similar interest in clinical excellence. During their frequent meetings, Amy provides assistance with learning aspects of the manager’s role, including technical aspects, such as how to interpret budget printouts and to achieve budget outcomes. The success of Amy’s coaching depends on
a. clarity of Amy’s information.
b. organizational support for the mentor relationship.
c. the congruence of Amy’s beliefs with Samia’s beliefs.
d. willingness of Samia to receive feedback.

 

 

ANS:  D

Coaching provides information about how to improve performance and learning aspects of the role. Coaching requires willingness on the part of the mentee to accept feedback.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 509 | Page 511

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. In addition to providing coaching, a nurse mentor may provide counselling to the mentee. For counselling to be successful, the mentor must
a. provide a quiet environment away from the unit.
b. keep the focus on technical and management responsibilities.
c. ensure confidentiality.
d. present assignments that stretch the intellectual and technical ability of the mentee.

 

 

ANS:  C

Counselling provides opportunity for the mentee to share personal concerns. For counselling to be successful, confidentiality must be ensured.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 509 | Page 511

TOP:   Nursing Process: Planning

 

  1. According to Duchscher (2011), the integration phase in the transition to a new professional role for the new nursing graduate includes actions such as
a. performing and learning.
b. separating and exploring.
c. adjusting and accommodating.
d. doubting and revealing.

 

 

ANS:  D

According to Duchscher (2011), the integration phase in the transition to a new professional role for new nursing graduates includes actions such as doubting and revealing. The orientation phase includes actions such as performing, learning adjusting, and accommodation. The stabilization phase includes such actions as separating and exploring.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 506, Figure 27-2

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. Samia (questions 11 to 15) finds that she is comfortable with the expectations of staff and her supervisor with regard to her management role and responsibilities and has been able to effect a strong commitment to quality clinical care on the unit. At this point, Samia has probably attained role
a. development.
b. acceptance.
c. symmetry.
d. stabilization.

 

 

ANS:  D

Role stabilization occurs as employees’ performance of all facets of their new roles matures, to the point at which they internalize their roles, performing them fluidly and with confidence. At this juncture, the employees have learned the behaviours that meet the role expectations, and these behaviours have become second nature. Role acceptance refers to accepting the contract and making a public announcement of the acceptance.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   REF:   Page 506

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. As a nurse manager, you have hired two new graduates for your unit. To assist the new graduates in their role transition from student to practicing RN, you advocate for
a. a journalling program.
b. hiring a nurse educator to work with these and other new graduates.
c. additional time off for nurses to practice RN skills.
d. additional staff while nurses are being orientated.

 

 

ANS:  B

Although it is reasonable to expect graduates of nursing programs to be prepared for general practice at a novice level, it is not realistic to think that they will be ready to absorb the tensions of a system that even the most experienced nurse finds taxing. Providing formal and extended mentorship programs, supplying individualized and flexible orientations, fostering workplace cultures that embrace learning and recognize growth, and enhancing partnerships between clinical practice areas and academia will go a long way toward creating a context that empowers all nurses to practice quality care.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 509 | Page 511

TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

 

  1. Oscar, a new nurse manager, complains to his colleague that he feels very uncomfortable with the conflict between what he thinks he should be doing as the manager and what his supervisor thinks he should be doing. According to Hardy’s (1978) role theory, Oscar is experiencing
a. stress.
b. role stress.
c. role strain.
d. role exploration.

 

 

ANS:  C

According to Hardy, role strain is the subjective feeling of distress that occurs when role stress or a social condition of conflicting demands or difficult conditions is present. Role stress is a social condition in which role demands are conflicting irritating, difficult, or impossible to fulfill, rather than a person’s subjective feelings or the perception of conflicting demands.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 505, Theory Box

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. Seth is hired as the nurse manager for a surgical unit. After a year, the hospital reorganizes, and his position is lost. In leaving the unit, it is important for Seth to
a. engage in clarifying why the hospital did not state its expectations for the unit at the time of hiring.
b. hire a lawyer to represent his interests during this unexpected role transition.
c. seek counselling to deal with his shock and anger.
d. negotiate a reasonable settlement.

 

 

ANS:  D

When role transition occurs as a result of restructuring, the unit manager should request and negotiate reasonable compensation and assistance, even if it is not offered initially by the employer.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 506        TOP:   Nursing Process: Planning

 

  1. After several months in the role of manager of a dialysis unit, Maryanne finds herself still questioning the gap between her and her staff’s expectations and management’s expectations and is also questioning whether she can reconcile her concerns with quality care with the strong cost-containment orientation of the facility. At this point, Maryanne is in which stage of role transition?
a. Internalization
b. Acceptance
c. Development
d. Discrepancy

 

 

ANS:  D

At this point, Maryanne is still experiencing discomfort and disillusionment with the gap between what she expected and what others expect of her in the performance of her role as manager. She is considering the significance and fit of the relationship for her, which is consistent with role discrepancy.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 506

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

  1. In assisting new graduates to make the role transition to graduate nurse, Teo, the unit manager, initiates which of the following?
a. Self-checklist to assess competencies that have been strengthened
b. Discussions that focus on what the new graduates have yet to learn
c. Fixed target dates for acquisition of competency and transition to RN role
d. Frequent formal meetings to provide feedback on performance and areas to be strengthened

 

 

ANS:  A

Transition to the new role is facilitated through reflection and ongoing development of awareness of strengths (as opposed to a focus on weaknesses) or strengthening of internal resources. Understanding strengths and values assists in response to situations and relationships. The value of the employee may not depend on quickness in making the role transition.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   REF:   Pages 507-508

TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

 

  1. Who of the following might be the best mentor for Kira, a new nurse manager on the cardiac unit who has 4 years of previous clinical experience?
a. Saul, near retirement. He has 20 years of clinical nursing and recently assumed role of head nurse in an interim capacity because of the incumbent’s illness.
b. Leilani, who has been a clinical educator at the institution for a number of years. She has tired of her role and aspires to become a nurse manager. She looks at mentorship as an opportunity to understand the role better.
c. Courtney, who has been a nurse manager for 3 years. Her staff and supervisor value her skills, her leadership acumen, and her championship of innovation.
d. Adrian, who was nurse manager for 3 yearsRemember,on after graduation. He left the role because he was uncomfortable with the expectations and has been a team leader in the surgery unit for 15 years.

 

 

ANS:  C

A mentor needs to have sufficient professional experience and organizational authority so that he or she can mentor the career of the mentee. Mentors need competencies that include interpersonal and communication effectiveness, risk taking and creativity, and ability to inspire change.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze                REF:   Page 510, Box 27-4

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

 

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

 

  1. As a result of Amy’s coaching, Samia (question 16) completes an assessment of responsibilities, opportunities, lines of communication, expectations, and support (ROLES). This assessment is helpful in (Select all that apply.)
a. identifying her clinical knowledge.
b. role development.
c. areas of conflict in expectations.
d. management responsibilities.

 

 

ANS:  B, C, D

A ROLES assessment is useful in identifying, confirming, and visualizing responsibilities, opportunities, lines of communication, expectations of self and others for the position, and support. This is particularly useful in identifying areas of conflict in expectations, including conflict between the manager’s own expectations and those of staff and supervisors and in negotiating role expectations.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   Page 508

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

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