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Nutritional Foundations 4th Edition Grodner Long Roth Test Bank

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Nutritional Foundations 4th Edition Grodner Long Roth Test Bank

ISBN:

0323045294

ISBN-13:

9780323045292

Description

Nutritional Foundations 4th Edition Grodner Long Roth Test Bank

ISBN:

0323045294

ISBN-13:

9780323045292

 

 

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Free Nursing Test Questions:

 

Grodner: Foundations and Clinical Applications of Nutrition: A Nursing Approach, 4th Edition

 

Chapter 19: Nutrition for Diabetes Mellitus

Test Bank

Multiple Choice

  1. A person is diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus if his or her fasting blood glucose level on two occasions is greater than
a. 90 mg/dL.
b. 120 mg/dL.
c. 126 mg/dL.
d. 156 mg/dL.

 

 

ANS:   C

REF:    Pages 422-423

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Assessment

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Long-term complications of diabetes mellitus include
a. arthritis, rheumatism, and osteoporosis.
b. retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy.
c. impaired immunity and opportunistic infections.
d. dermatitis, nephrotic syndrome, and detached retina.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Page 424

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. The type of diabetes therapy that seems to be most effective in decreasing and delaying the complications of diabetes is
a. psychotherapy.
b. intensive therapy.
c. combined therapy.
d. conventional therapy.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Page 424

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Therapeutic care

 

  1. The three main symptoms of type 1 diabetes mellitus are
a. polyphagia, polyuria, and polydipsia.
b. neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy.
c. confusion, loss of coordination, and headaches.
d. fatigue, loss of appetite, and frequent infections.

 

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 424

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Assessment

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. The cause of type 1 diabetes mellitus is
a. excessive intake of simple sugars.
b. destruction of pancreatic beta cells.
c. inability of cells to respond to insulin in the bloodstream.
d. inability of the pancreas to keep up with the body’s demands for insulin.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Page 424

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. The two strongest risk factors for type 2 diabetes are
a. obesity and family history.
b. recurrent viral infections and stress.
c. male gender and upper body obesity.
d. preference for sweet foods and sedentary lifestyle.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 430

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Assessment, analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. In individuals with type 2 diabetes, insulin production is generally
a. absent.
b. normal.
c. decreased.
d. increased.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Page 430

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more prevalent in children, largely because of
a. increased intakes of refined sugar.
b. increased awareness and diagnosis.
c. the increasing prevalence of overweight children.
d. inheritance of a dominant gene that causes the disease.

 

 

ANS:   C

REF:    Pages 440-441

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

 

 

  1. For individuals with diabetes mellitus, glycosylated hemoglobin (HgbA1c) levels should be less than
a. 6%.
b. 7%.
c. 8%.
d. 10%.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Page 427

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Assessment

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium | CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. The ethnic group that has the lowest prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is
a. Native Americans.
b. African Americans.
c. Hispanic Americans.
d. non-Hispanic whites.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Page 430

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Exogenous insulin is a required part of treatment for all individuals with
a. type 1 diabetes mellitus.
b. type 2 diabetes mellitus.
c. gestational diabetes.
d. impaired glucose tolerance.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 424

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. The main difference between the different types of exogenous insulin is
a. their shelf life.
b. the concentration of the preparation.
c. the type of solvent used to carry the insulin.
d. the length of time they take to act in the body.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Page 427

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Sulfonylureas and glipizides decrease blood glucose levels by
a. stimulating insulin secretion.
b. slowing the rate of digestion and absorption of food.
c. providing an exogenous source of insulin.
d. delaying glucose absorption from the GI tract.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 431

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Patients with diabetes mellitus should exercise at times when their blood glucose level is
a. between 90 and 110 mg/dL.
b. between 100 and 160 mg/dL.
c. between 100 and 200 mg/dL.
d. less than 250 mg/dL.

 

 

ANS:   C

REF:    Page 429

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning, implementation

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. To prevent hypoglycemia after exercise, patients with type 1 diabetes should
a. decrease their insulin dose.
b. omit a scheduled insulin dose.
c. increase their intake of protein-based foods.
d. increase their intake of carbohydrate-based foods.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Page 429

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning, implementation

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Therapeutic care | CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Patients with type 2 diabetes are most likely to maintain good metabolic control if they
a. avoid all sources of simple carbohydrates.
b. avoid eating during the evening or at night.
c. space their meals evenly throughout the day.
d. eat one large meal and two small meals each day.

 

 

ANS:   C

REF:    Page 433

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning, implementation

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Therapeutic care | CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Glycosylated hemoglobin level is used to indicate
a. the effect of meals on blood glucose level.
b. day-to-day variations in blood glucose level.
c. iron deficiency anemia in patients with diabetes.
d. overall blood glucose control over several weeks.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Pages 431-432

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Evaluation

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. A young man with type 1 diabetes runs 3 miles, falls asleep on the sofa, and forgets to eat his next meal. He is likely to experience
a. nephropathy.
b. hypoglycemia.
c. hyperglycemia.
d. diabetic ketoacidosis.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Page 432

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Symptoms of low blood glucose are usually experienced when the blood glucose level falls below
a. 50 mg/dL.
b. 60 mg/dL.
c. 90 mg/dL.
d. 110 mg/dL.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 432

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Assessment

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Diabetic ketoacidosis may occur in a patient with type 1 diabetes who
a. gets caught in traffic and misses a meal.
b. participates in an all-day sporting event.
c. accidentally takes a double dose of insulin.
d. goes away for the weekend and forgets to take his or her insulin.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Page 432

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Ketones accumulate in the blood during diabetic ketoacidosis because of
a. increased metabolism of fatty acids and decreased metabolism of glucose.
b. increased metabolism of glucose and decreased metabolism of fatty acids.
c. increased metabolism of amino acids and decreased metabolism of glucose.
d. increased metabolism of glucose and decreased metabolism of amino acids.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 432

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome is characterized by hyperglycemia
a. with edema.
b. with ketosis.
c. without ketosis.
d. without polyuria.

 

 

ANS:   C

REF:    Page 432

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. American Diabetes Association goals for individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus include
a. increasing physical activity and moderate weight loss.
b. decreasing intake of dietary fat and smoking cessation.
c. increasing intake of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.
d. increasing intake of dietary fiber and decreasing intake of simple carbohydrates.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 433

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Therapeutic care

 

  1. Patients with type 1 diabetes should be taught to regulate the
a. kcal content of meals and snacks.
b. total amount of sugars in meals and snacks.
c. total amount of dietary fiber in meals and snacks.
d. total amount of carbohydrates in meals and snacks.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Page 436

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning, implementation

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Meal planning approaches used in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) include
a. counting carbohydrates.
b. following MyPyramid.
c. self-monitoring of blood glucose levels.
d. following the American Diabetes Association (ADA) dietary recommendations.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 436

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Therapeutic care | CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Sugar alcohols appear to be safe for use as sweetening agents, but their use may
a. cause diarrhea.
b. result in weight gain.
c. have adverse effects on plasma lipid levels.
d. displace more nutrient-dense foods in the diet.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 434

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. To facilitate compliance, the prescribed meal plan for patients with diabetes mellitus should
a. include some favorite foods each week.
b. be based on the patient’s usual eating habits.
c. be tailored to achieve individual weight-loss goals.
d. include meals and snacks eaten at the same time each day.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Pages 433-434

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Psychosocial and emotional equilibrium

 

  1. During illness, patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are likely to need
a. less insulin.
b. more insulin.
c. a different type of insulin.
d. the same amount of insulin.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Page 436

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium | CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who are sick and unable to eat should consume
a. parenteral nutrition support.
b. commercial liquid nutrition supplements.
c. liquid, semiliquid, or soft sources of carbohydrates.
d. noncaloric fluids only to minimize the increase in blood glucose level.

 

 

ANS:   C

REF:    Page 436

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning, implementation

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Patients with diabetes mellitus and gastroparesis may benefit from
a. six small meals daily.
b. three regular meals daily.
c. a high-protein diet.
d. increased fluid intake.

 

 

ANS:   A

REF:    Page 437

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Planning

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Therapeutic care

 

 

 

  1. Control of maternal blood glucose levels is important during pregnancy to protect the infant from development of
a. obesity.
b. macrosomia.
c. type 1 diabetes mellitus.
d. pancreatic insufficiency.

 

 

ANS:   B
REF:    Page 438

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium

 

  1. For women with type 1 diabetes, good metabolic control is especially important at the time of conception and during the first trimester to prevent
a. macrosomia.
b. fetal malformations.
c. nutrient deficiencies.
d. excessive weight gain.

 

 

ANS:   B

REF:    Page 438

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Physiologic and anatomic equilibrium | CLIENT NEEDS: Education and health promotion

 

  1. Most children who develop type 2 diabetes are treated using diet, exercise, and
a. family therapy.
b. exogenous insulin.
c. behavior modification.
d. oral hypoglycemic agents.

 

 

ANS:   D

REF:    Page 441

TOP:    NURSING PROCESS: Analysis

MSC:   CLIENT NEEDS: Therapeutic care

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