Sale!

Psychology Themes and Variations 10th Edition Weiten Test Bank

$80.00 $12.99

Psychology Themes and Variations 10th Edition Weiten Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1305498204

ISBN-10: 1305498208

 

Description

Psychology Themes and Variations 10th Edition Weiten Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1305498204

ISBN-10: 1305498208

 

 

 

Be the best nurse you can be:

Nursing test banks are legit and very helpful. This test bank on this page can be downloaded immediately after you checkout today.

Here is the definition of nursing

Its true that you will receive the entire legit test bank for this book and it can happen today regardless if its day or night. We have made the process automatic for you so that you don’t have to wait.

We encourage you to purchase from only a trustworthy provider:

Our site is one of the most confidential websites on the internet. We maintain no logs and guarantee it. Our website is also encrypted with an SSL on the entire website which will show on your browser with a lock symbol. This means not a single person can view any information.

, if you prefer a digital instead of a hardcover.

Have any comments or suggestions?

When you get your file today you will be able to open it on your device and start studying for your class right now.

Free Nursing Test Questions:

Chapter 10 NON-Multiple Choice

 

COMPLETION

 

  1. The ____________________ stage of prenatal development refers to the first two weeks after conception.

 

ANS:  germinal

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.1 Progress Before Birth: Prenatal Development

 

 

  1. Maternal ____________________ during the prenatal period has been linked to birth complications.

 

ANS:  malnutrition

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.1 Progress Before Birth: Prenatal Development

 

 

  1. The gradual unfolding of one’s genetic blueprint is known as ________________.

 

ANS:  maturation

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

 

  1. According to ____________________, infants are biologically programmed to emit behavior that triggers an affectionate, protective response from adults.

 

ANS:  John Bowlby

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

 

 

  1. Keshawn is happy to play quietly alongside his mother, becomes visibly upset when she leaves, but is quickly calmed by her return. According to Mary Ainsworth, Keshawn is a(n) ____________________ attached infant.

 

ANS:  securely

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

 

 

  1. A toddler’s vocabulary grows rapidly between 18 and 24 months, as children engage in ____________________, or mapping a word onto an underlying concept after only one exposure.

 

ANS:  fast mapping

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

 

 

  1. According to Erikson’s theory of development, a sense of ____________________ develops in an infant whose basic biological and emotional needs are adequately met.

 

ANS:  trust

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.3 Personality, Cognitive, and Moral Development in Childhood

 

 

  1. Piaget called the tendency to focus on just one feature of a problem while neglecting other aspects ____________________.

 

ANS:  centration

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.3 Personality, Cognitive, and Moral Development in Childhood

 

 

  1. Personal guiding principles take precedence over laws in deciding right or wrong behavior in the ____________________ stage of moral reasoning.

 

ANS:  postconventional

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.3 Personality, Cognitive, and Moral Development in Childhood

 

 

  1. The suggestion that the ____________________ cortex, characterized as the “executive control center” of the brain, appears to be the last area of the brain to fully mature has been used as a possible explanation for why ____________________ behavior peaks during adolescence.

 

ANS:  prefrontal; risky

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.4 The Transition of Adolescence

 

  1. Both of Karlee’s parents are teachers, as are two of her uncles. For as long as she can remember, she has wanted to be a schoolteacher, just like these role models. According to James Marcia, Karlee would be considered to be in a state of identity ____________________.

 

ANS:  foreclosure

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.4 The Transition of Adolescence

 

  1. Jeffrey Arnett’s term for the new stage of development brought about by lengthier participation in higher education and increased barriers to financial independence is ____________________.

 

ANS:  emerging adulthood

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.4 The Transition of Adolescence

 

  1. According to Erik Erikson, the psychosocial crisis during the retirement years involves the tendency to dwell on the mistakes of the past, which could lead to the development of ____________________.

 

ANS:  despair

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.5 The Expanse of Adulthood

 

  1. Karl and his fiancée are about to be married; according to recent research, they will be most likely to have difficulty adjusting to their marriage if they have different ____________________.

 

ANS:  role expectations

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.5 The Expanse of Adulthood

 

  1. Dementia occurs in ____________________ of people between the ages of 75-80.

 

ANS:  15-20%

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.5 The Expanse of Adulthood

 

  1. Drastic mental decline is not part of the normal aging process, but 15–20% percent of adults over age 75 will show some form of a cognitive deficit known as ____________________.

 

ANS:  dementia

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.5 The Expanse of Adulthood

 

  1. Gender differences in the cognitive domain show that ____________________ tend to exhibit slightly better verbal skills, while ____________________ show a slight advantages in mathematical ability beginning in high school.

 

ANS:  females; males

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.7 Personal Application: Understanding Gender Differences

 

 

  1. Blankenhorn (1995) and Popenoe (2009) argue that fathers are ____________________ to normal, healthy development; critics, however, argue that a better conclusion is that fathers may ____________________ normal, healthy development.

 

ANS:  essential; promote

 

PTS:   1

REF:   10.8 Critical Thinking Application: Are Fathers Essential to Children’s Well-Being?

 

 

 

SHORT ANSWER

 

  1. Briefly describe the major developmental processes that occur during the three periods of prenatal development.

 

ANS:

Prenatal development begins with the germinal stage, lasting from conception to about 2 weeks. During this stage, rapid cell division occurs, and the mass of cells migrates to the uterus and beings to implant into the uterine wall, forming a placenta during the implantation process. The placenta is a structure that allows oxygen and nutrients to pass into the fetus from the mother’s bloodstream and bodily wastes to pass out to the mother.

 

The embryonic stage lasts from 2 weeks to 2 months and is the period when most of the vital organs and bodily systems such as the heart, spine, and brain emerge. The embryonic period is a time of great vulnerability; if anything interferes with development during this time period, effects can be devastating.

 

The fetal period lasts from 2 months to birth. During the early parts of this stage, the muscles and bones begin to form. The body continues to grow and function.  The fetus is capable of movement. Respiratory and digestive systems mature.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.1 Progress Before Birth: Prenatal Development

DIF:  Understand

 

 

  1. What is meant by the term “age of viability,” and when does it occur in human development?

 

ANS:

Age of viability refers to the age at which a baby can survive in the event of a premature birth. In humans, it occurs somewhere between 23 and 25 weeks of gestational age. At 23 weeks, chances for survival are slim, but by 25 weeks, chances improve to a survival rate of about 67%.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.1 Progress Before Birth: Prenatal Development

DIF:  Understand

 

 

  1. Describe the cultural variations observed in cross-cultural studies of motor development.

 

ANS:

Motor development refers to the progression of muscular coordination required for physical activities. Cultural variations in motor development highlight the dynamic interplay between experience and maturation. Rapid motor development has been observed in cultures like the Kipsigis of Kenya, who provide special practice in basic motor skills, and slow motor development is seen in cultures that discourage motor explorations in their infants. Cultural variations show that environmental factors can accelerate or slow motor development.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

DIF:  Understand

 

  1. Define the concept of attachment and summarize the patterns of attachment seen in infants

 

ANS:

Attachment refers to the close, emotional bonds of affection that develop between infants and their caregivers. Attachment is generally observed through observation of separation anxiety, or the emotional distress seen in many infants when they are separated from people with whom they have formed an attachment.

 

In the 1970s, Mary Ainsworth found that most infants have a secure attachment, playing and exploring comfortably when mom is present, becoming visibly upset when she leaves, and calming quickly upon her return.

 

Some babies, however, show anxiety even when mom is near and protest excessively when she leaves, but are not particularly comforted when she returns. Ainsworth labeled this pattern anxious-ambivalent attachment. FinallyRemember,me babies seek little contact with their mothers and are not distressed when she leaves, a pattern Ainsworth labeled avoidant attachment.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

DIF:  Understand

 

  1. Briefly discuss the significance of secure attachment to later development

 

ANS:

Evidence suggests that securely attached children tend to become resilient, competent toddlers, with high self-esteem. In preschool, they show more persistence, curiosity, more positive moods, healthier strategies for coping with stress, and less hostility and aggression.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

DIF:  Understand

 

  1. Briefly describe the types of errors that children make during their first attempts at language use.

 

ANS:

Children often make under- and overextensions in which they use words too narrowly or too broadly. They also make grammatical errors by overregularizing and applying grammatical rules to irregular cases.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.2 MotorRemember,cial, and Language Development in Childhood

DIF:  Apply

 

  1. Briefly describe the basic tenets of Erikson’s theory, and describe his stages of childhood and adult personality development.

 

ANS:

Erik Erikson proposed a theory of personality development based on stages. Many theories of development describe development in terms of stages, or developmental periods during which characteristic patterns of behavior are exhibited and certain capacities become established.

 

Erikson theorized that there are eight stages spanning the lifespan in personality development. He held that there is a specific psychosocial crisis during each stage, the outcome of which determines the balance between opposing polarities in personality. The eight stages are trust versus mistrust; autonomy versus shame and doubt; initiative versus guilt; industry versus inferiority; identity versus confusion, intimacy versus isolation; generativity versus self-absorption; and integrity versus despair.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   Chapter 10                DIF:  Understand

 

  1. Briefly describe Kohlberg’s stages of moral development, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Kohlberg’s theory.

 

ANS:

Lawrence Kohlberg devised a stage theory of moral development based on subjects’ responses to presented moral dilemmas. Kohlberg was interested in a person’s reasoning, not necessarily his or her answer.

 

He theorized that people progress through a series of three levels of moral development – preconventional, conventional, and postconventional. Each stage represents a different way of thinking about right and wrong. Preconventional thinkers think in terms of external authority, where acts are deemed wrong because they are punished; conventional thinkers think in terms of maintaining social order, rules are absolute, and they follow rules to win approval from others; and postconventional thinkers think in terms of a personal code of ethics.

 

Kolhberg’s theory has received some support. Studies show that children generally do progress through his stages of moral reasoning in the order he proposed. However,it is not unusual to find that a person shows signs of several adjacent levels of moral reasoning. Furthermore, Kohlberg’s model is much more culture-specific than he realized—focusing on individualistic ideas and interpersonal conflicts.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.3 Personality, Cognitive, and Moral Development in Childhood

DIF:  Understand

 

  1. Briefly describe the major events of puberty, and discuss the impact of the timing of the onset of puberty in males and females.

 

ANS:

Puberty is the stage during which sexual functions reach maturity, marking the beginning of adolescence. It is during puberty that the primary sex characteristics, the structures necessary for reproduction, develop fully. In females, the onset of puberty is signaled by menarche – the fist occurrence of menstruation. In males, it is signaled by spermarche – the first occurrence of ejaculation.

 

Puberty is occurring at younger ages compared to previous generations; explanations for this trend include improvements in nutrition and medical care. The timing of puberty varies individually (12-13 for girls is typical, 13-14 for boys). Studies of early maturers versus late maturers indicate that there are sex differences in effects of early versus late maturation, with early-maturing girls and late-maturing boys having greater risk for psychological problems and social difficulties.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.4 The Transition of Adolescence            DIF:  Understand

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Summarize the impact of environmental factors on prenatal development.

 

ANS:

A developing baby and its mother are linked through the placenta, and a mother’s behaviors can affect the baby dramatically.

 

Severe maternal malnutrition is linked to increased risk of birth complications and neurological problems in the newborn. The effects of moderate maternal malnutrition are more difficult to evaluate.

 

Maternal drug use can significantly impact a developing baby, even if the drugs are legal, like alcohol and tobacco. Many drugs, both prescription and recreational, are linked to birth defects. Problems can even be caused by some drugs prescribed for medical reasons.

 

Fetal alcohol syndrome, one of the leading causes of mental retardation, is a collection of congenital (inborn) problems associated with excessive alcohol use during pregnancy. Problems include microcephaly, heart defects, irritability, hyperactivity, and delayed mental and motor development.

 

Maternal illness can also interfere with prenatal development; the nature of the damage depends, in part, on when the mother contracts the illness and the type of illness. HIV can be transmitted to the offspring through either the placenta or breast milk or even during delivery.

 

Environmental Toxins. Prenatal exposure to air pollution has been linked with later impairments in cognitive development. Exposure to chemicals used in flame-retardant materials correlates with slower mental and physical development through age 6.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.1 Progress Before Birth: Prenatal Development

DIF:  Understand

 

 

  1. Describe the four stages of cognitive development proposed by Jean Piaget, and discuss the major developmental changes associated with each of the stages.

 

ANS:

Answers to this question should include the correct names for each of the stages and the ages associated with each stage in Piaget’s theory: sensorimotor (0-2 years), preoperational (2-7 years), concrete operational (7-11 years), and formal operational (11+ years). In addition, the key accomplishments and key limitations at each stage should be included. During the sensorimotor stage, object permanence emerges. During the preoperational stage, children show evidence of centration, irreversibility, and egocentrism. During the concrete operational stage, children develop the ability to solve conservation problems and hierarchical classification problems, and the limitations of the preoperational period (egocentrism, centration, and irreversibility) decline or disappear. Finally, during the formal operational stage, children become capable of abstract reasoning.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.3 Personality, Cognitive, and Moral Development in Childhood

DIF:  Understand

 

  1. Research on adolescence indicates that for girls, early maturation is particularly difficult, while for boys, late maturation is especially hard. How would you explain this gender difference? Consider how your text’s unifying theme that psychology evolves in a sociohistorical context might help to explain it.

 

ANS:

Answers to this question should center on the fact that these differences arise from society’s beliefs and expectations about what behaviors are appropriate for males and females.

 

Here’s one course an answer to this question could take: boys are socialized toward achievement in the world of action. Physically mature boys appear to be more competent achievers, better able to meet society’s expectations for males. Late-maturing boys may appear inept in this regard, which is threatening to their self-esteem. Girls, on the other hand, have traditionally been socialized to become wives and mothers—roles that are closely tied to their biological and sexual characteristics. In short, the traditional role of the female has been to be the source and preserver of the family. Marital and family relationships are therefore threatened by a woman’s sexual involvement outside the bounds of marriage. The early-maturing girl, because she arouses sexual feelings in other males and because of her own developing sexual desires, is thus seen as a threat. She is viewed with suspicion and made to feel ashamed of her developing sexuality.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.4 The Transition of Adolescence

KEY:  Critical Thinking

 

  1. Research indicates that there are genuine (although often small) gender differences in verbal ability, mathematical ability, spatial ability, aggression, and nonverbal communication. There is also some evidence that biological differences between the sexes in hormone levels and brain organization contribute to some or all of these behavioral differences. Adopt an evolutionary perspective, and discuss why these biological differences and their consequent behavioral differences might exist.

 

ANS:

Possibilities: aggressiveness and spatial ability might have served the male in his role as provider, especially as hunter, while the female bore and reared the young. Communicative abilities (verbal ability and nonverbal communication) could conceivably have been useful to females in their roles as preservers of family and other important relationships. Mathematical ability is a tough one, though creative students will be able to come up with something.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.7 Personal Application: Understanding Gender Differences

DIF:  Critical Thinking

 

  1. Briefly define and differentiate the terms gender stereotype and gender role. Then describe how operant conditioning, observational learning, and self-socialization contribute to gender role socialization.

 

ANS:

Gender stereotypes are widely held beliefs about females’ and males’ abilities, traits, and behavior; gender roles are expectations about what is appropriate behavior for each sex.

 

Gender roles emerge through a process of socialization where people acquire norms for appropriate behavior within a society. Gender-role socialization is affected by at least three processes. Through operant conditioning, roles are shaped by reward and punishment. Through observational learning, children imitate the gender-appropriate behavior of adults. Through self-socialization, children classify themselves as male or female and then strive to bring their behavior in line with what is gender appropriate in their culture.  Families, schools, and the media all play important roles in gender-role socialization.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   10.7 Personal Application: Understanding Gender Differences

DIF:  Understand

 

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Psychology Themes and Variations 10th Edition Weiten Test Bank”

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *