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The Enduring Democracy 3rd Edition Dautrich Yalof Test Bank

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The Enduring Democracy 3rd Edition Dautrich Yalof Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1285194073

ISBN-10: 1285194071

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The Enduring Democracy 3rd Edition Dautrich Yalof Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-1285194073

ISBN-10: 1285194071

 

 

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CHAPTER 3: Federalism

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. An example of state actions forcing federal action was
a. the Fugitive Slave Act.
b. Personal Liberty Laws.
c. Arizona SB 1070.
d. Options A, B, and C are true.
e. None of the above is true.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   52                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. An example of a confederation is the
a. The European Community.
b. The United States of America.
c. France.
d. United Nations.
e. A and D.

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   54                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. A system of government in which power is divided between a central authority and constituent political subunits is called a(n)
a. state system.
b. federal system, or federated system.
c. dual system.
d. democracy.
e. national system.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   54                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. To maintain the doctrine of federalism, it
a. must be ordered by a court with proper jurisdiction.
b. must be voted into existence by the people.
c. cannot coexist within a democracy.
d. generally requires the existence of a central government tier and a subnational tier, with each tier assigned its own significant powers.
e. must coexist within a monarchy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   54                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. Sovereignty is defined as
a. the power of a governmental unit to control the destiny of another unit.
b. the lack of a centralized government.
c. the supreme political power of a government to regulate its affairs with outside interference.
d. the political power to control all subordinate governments.
e. a state of anarchy.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   54                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. In a system of federalism, in which sovereign government does the individual hold citizenship?
a. The individual is considered only as a citizen of the national government and simply a resident of the state.
b. The state holds the individual’s citizenship.
c. Some states allow dual citizenship whereas others do not.
d. The individual is a citizen of both the state and the national governments.
e. The individual must choose his/her citizenship.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   54                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. Individuals in the U.S. have official status as citizens
a. in both the state in which they reside and in the nation as a whole.
b. in all 50 states and in the nation as a whole.
c. in the nation only, as the states do not confer citizenship status.
d. after the age of 18.
e. upon approval of the national government.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   54                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. A confederation
a. is defined as a single sovereign state.
b. consists of two or more governments that are legally bound to each other by contract.
c. may be defined as a league of independent states that voluntarily unite to achieve certain goals.
d. is a constitutional arrangement whereby two or more governments are required to cooperate.
e. is a state of political rebellion.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   54                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. Why could the United Nations be considered a confederation?
a. It is a league of sovereign countries that work together to enforce various international laws.
b. The United Nations cannot be considered a confederation.
c. It is bound by a constitution to perform certain powers.
d. When nations join they become subordinate to the United Nations governing body.
e. Member nations are subordinate to the European community.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   54                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. Which of the following is a system of government in which sovereignty rests in the central government alone, and states cannot exert direct authority over citizens without approval of the central government?
a. Federal system
b. Confederation
c. Unitary system
d. Parochial system
e. Secular system

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   54                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. England has a strong elected Parliament that serves as the central government. All local governments are subordinate to Parliament and the monarch is, in actuality, a figurehead. This governmental arrangement is an example of a(n)
a. confederation.
b. anti-monarchial system.
c. federation.
d. unitary system.
e. constitutional system.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   54                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. One frequent challenge with a unitary system of government is hypercentralism, which means that
a. an unhealthy and unusually excessive level of control exists in the central government.
b. multiple layers of government exist at the central level.
c. a multi-chambered parliament is unable to respond to needs of the constituency.
d. there is complete reliance on the central government and the extinguishing of individual state differences, which hampers local officials from appropriately responding to needs.
e. the elected officials who serve the central government exert abusive authority over the citizens.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   54                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. Germany has a strong central government but the country is also made up of 16 Bundesländer, the plural term for the regions that are very similar to American states. Each Bundesländ has its own strong local government that shares power with the central government. This government system is an example of
a. federalism.
b. democracy.
c. humanitarianism.
d. secularism.
e. unity.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   55                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. James Madison referred to the system of federalism as the “middle ground” of government types. What did he mean by this statement?
a. The federal system is very weak because it fails to establish itself in contrast to unitary and confederation systems.
b. Unitary systems and confederation systems are opposing ends of the continuum. Federalism has elements of both systems but is the best attempt to balance the powers and needs of the state versus federal governments.
c. The government fails to take a definitive stance.
d. Federalism is the second most preferred system of government, after the unitary system.
e. The federal system abolishes the individual powers of the central and state governments in favor of a weaker, but more balanced, hybrid government.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   55                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. In the U.S. Constitution, powers that are not expressly given to Congress but are retained by the state governments are called
a. enumerated powers.
b. reserved powers.
c. concurrent powers.
d. federal powers.
e. decentralized powers.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   56                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. Constitutional powers that are shared by both the federal and state governments are called
a. enumerated powers.
b. reserved powers.
c. concurrent powers.
d. moderate powers.
e. constituent powers.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   56                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. Which of the following is NOT a power held by the national legislature under the U.S. Constitution?
a. To lay and collect taxes
b. To raise and support armies and navies
c. To declare war
d. To coin money
e. To provide for the health, safety, and welfare of citizens

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   56                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. The power to establish bankruptcy laws is an example of a(n)
a. enumerated power.
b. reserved power.
c. concurrent power.
d. dictated power.
e. revealed power.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   56                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. The power to conduct elections is an example of a(n)
a. enumerated power.
b. reserved power.
c. concurrent power.
d. dictated power.
e. revealed power.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   56                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. The power to coin money is an example of a(n)
a. enumerated power.
b. reserved power.
c. concurrent power.
d. dictated power.
e. revealed power.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   56                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. Powers explicitly delegated to the Congress under Article I of the U.S. Constitution are referred to as
a. enumerated powers.
b. reserved powers.
c. concurrent powers.
d. federal powers.
e. constituent powers.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   56                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. The Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides
a. freedom of speech.
b. citizenship rights to all natural born residents.
c. that any powers not expressly given to Congress are reserved to the states.
d. that the national government is supreme.
e. for the powers of judicial review.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   57                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. Article I of the U.S. Constitution grants that Congress has the power to make laws that are “necessary and proper” to carry out its duties. What is the meaning of this statement?
a. Congress has implied powers that are not expressly stated in the Constitution and, though not expressly stated, Congress has an expectation to enact legislation to carry out its duties.
b. Congress is required to enact most laws.
c. The Constitution contains all of the rights and powers necessary for Congress to perform its duties.
d. Congress ultimately has the power to override any state laws that it deems unnecessary or improper.
e. Congress is expected to keep its lawmaking function to a minimum.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   57                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. Article VI of the U.S. Constitution contains the supremacy clause. What is the importance of this clause?
a. It requires that the individual state constitutions will be the “supreme law of the land” and that the national constitution may not override them.
b. It creates the standard that no other law, state constitution, or government action may override the U.S. Constitution, which is considered the “supreme law of the land.”
c. It states that Congress is supreme over the other two branches of government.
d. It provides that no single government has supremacy over another.
e. It establishes the supremacy of the American citizen as the ultimate power.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   57                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. When the U.S. Supreme Court interprets and makes a ruling concerning a question involving the U.S. Constitution,
a. that ruling has no bearing on the state governments.
b. the ruling only applies to an agency or official of the federal government.
c. the supremacy clause applies only to the Constitution and not to Supreme Court actions.
d. that ruling may be overridden by a state’s supreme court.
e. any state legislature or state court must also abide by the interpretation of the U.S. Constitution by the Supreme Court.

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   57                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. When the Congress exercises power given to it under Article I, the federal law it creates may supersede a state law. This process is known as
a. federal abuse of power.
b. unconstitutional action.
c. the doctrine of preemption.
d. the doctrine of fair business practice.
e. judicial review.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   57                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. What was the name of the landmark case that concluded when a state supreme court’s decision is in direct conflict with a decision by the United States Supreme Court, each state legislature must abide by those rulings?
a. Marbury v. Madison
b. McCulloch v. Maryland
c. Bas v. Tingy
d. Martin v. Mott
e. Martin v. Hunter’s Lessee

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   57                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. Article IV, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution contains the full faith and credit clause. What does this clause guarantee?
a. The states must have full faith that the federal government’s decisions are correct.
b. The federal government is a guaranteed lender to the state governments for operational funds.
c. Each state will abide by the decisions of other state and local governments, including their judicial decisions, and will respect the civil laws of each state.
d. The federal government has the power to mediate disputes among states regarding religion.
e. The federal government is committed to matters of faith and must ensure that the right to religious faith is upheld.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   57 | 58            NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. In one state, the civil court settles a dispute concerning assets in the estate of a deceased person. The one who loses the case in civil court cannot go into another state and have that state’s civil court revisit the case. This is an example of
a. the power of Congress to intervene and settle disputes between states.
b. the difference between the criminal and civil court systems.
c. the inability of the federal government to properly intervene in civil disagreements between states.
d. the practical application of the full faith and credit clause of the U.S. Constitution.
e. a breakdown in the civil court system in this nation.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   57 | 58            NOT:  applied

 

  1. In a federal system of government what is the role of the national government when disputes arise between states?
a. The federal government is powerless in disagreements between states.
b. The federal government has legislative powers to arbitrate disagreements between states.
c. Disagreements between states are arbitrated by a council of state executives; the federal government has no role.
d. The federal government has an equal vote and stake, as do the two or more states that are disagreeing.
e. The high courts of the states in disagreement arbitrate the dispute without interference of the federal government.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   58                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. Article IV, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution is referred to as the privileges and immunities clause. What does this section guarantee to American citizens?
a. The citizens of one state are immune to the civil laws of another state.
b. Citizens have privileges and not rights, which means that they are not immune to losing the privileges.
c. Every citizen has the right to travel through other states, reside in any state, and participate in business in any state.
d. Citizens are bound by the privileges in the state constitution, not the national constitution (U.S. Constitution).
e. Citizens are bound by the privileges in the national constitution (U.S. Constitution), not the constitutions of the states.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   58                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. The U.S. Supreme Court is the highest judicial body in the nation. In regard to states, why is this important?
a. It allows for the federal courts to take over the state courts when the states fail to act properly.
b. It gives the Supreme Court the authority to settle disputes between states, such as ownership of or jurisdiction over disputed property.
c. It allows Congress to pass laws that will control states that have gotten out of control.
d. It gives the nation a place to determine the winner of an election.
e. It takes power away from a potentially abusive Congress.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   58                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. According to Article IV, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution, when a fugitive from one state is apprehended in another state, what may the apprehending state do with the prisoner?
a. It has no authority over the prisoner.
b. It must turn the prisoner over to the federal government for arbitration.
c. It must retain the prisoner in the apprehending state so as to protect his or her rights from the abusive state.
d. It must retain the prisoner in the apprehending state until his or her sentence is completed.
e. It must extradite the prisoner to the original state for disposition.

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   58                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. If one state does not have a death penalty, can that state refuse to return a fugitive to face a possible death penalty in another state?
a. Yes; it is a moral obligation.
b. No; according to Article IV of the U.S. Constitution, states must respect and uphold the extradition laws of other states.
c. No; Congress has approved the death penalty for all states.
d. No; death penalty cases take precedent over other criminal cases.
e. Yes; but this is true only if the federal court intervenes and orders the prisoner’s transfer.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   58                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. Throughout history which of following has been true regarding American federalism?
a. Federalism has proven to be rigid and unchanging in the face of an ever-changing world.
b. The role and powers of the federal government have evolved as undisputed.
c. The powers of the state governments have become almost non-existent in light of national government powers.
d. Through several eras the pendulum has tended to swing between preferences for state versus federal powers and prerogatives.
e. American federalism has become almost non-existent.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   59                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. During the first 30 years or so of the new constitutional democracy in the United States, what was the relationship between the states and the new federal government?
a. This era saw a constant struggle between federal powers and those of the states. Eventually the federal government became dominant.
b. The federal government had no powers at this time and was, in effect, nonexistent.
c. During this era there was a unique and effective balance between the two governments.
d. This era is often referred to as the period of state-centered federalism, in which the states managed their own affairs with very little interference from the federal government.
e. During this era the new federal government was dominant.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   60                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. During the administrations of the first president, George Washington, and the second president, John Adams,
a. Supreme Court rulings had a tremendously negative effect on presidential and other federal powers.
b. state governments willingly surrendered powers to the federal government as recognition of its superiority.
c. states’ rights and powers were supreme and uncontested.
d. the federal government cautiously but consistently increased its powers and reach.
e. the new nation came very close to anarchy and collapse.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   60                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. One major result of President John Adams’s tenure was the appointment of John Marshall as Chief Justice of the United States. Marshall shared Adams’s ideologies and believed in a __________ doctrine of federalism.
a. national supremacy
b. state supremacy
c. Supreme Court supremacy
d. military
e. states’ rights

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   60                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. What was the significant ruling of the Supreme Court in McCulloch v. Maryland in 1819?
a. The Madison administration was held in contempt of court for its disagreement with the creation of a national bank.
b. Though the national bank was a creation of the federal government, it was subordinate to the government of the state in which it was located.
c. Based on the necessary and proper clause of the U.S. Constitution, the national bank had broad powers and was justified in using those powers when exercising the national government’s expressly delegated powers.
d. The Supreme Court had no power or jurisdiction to consider a case involving a state government.
e. Maryland’s state supreme court had jurisdiction over the federal court (Supreme Court).

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   60                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. “Nullification” was
a. a reaction to the Tariff of 1828.
b. expressed in a series of resolutions passed by the South Carolina state legislature.
c. based on the theory that state sovereignty allowed each state to nullify within its borders any law passed by Congress the state deemed unconstitutional.
d. Options A, B, and C are true.
e. None of the above is true.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   60 | 61            NOT:  factual

 

  1. The period spanning roughly 1837 to 1937 is considered by many scholars as a period of dual federalism. This period included the tenure of Chief Justice Roger Taney until the early years of President Franklin Roosevelt and his New Deal. Why is this era referred to as dual federalism?
a. During this time the state courts and the federal courts had equal powers and jurisdiction.
b. The jurisdiction between the state and federal governments was hard to differentiate.
c. The Supreme Court refused to give Congress the discretionary authority it enjoyed during earlier eras, yet the Court did not return to the doctrine of state sovereignty.
d. The Supreme Court made rulings that returned our nation to a period that was twice as committed to a strong central government.
e. The pendulum would constantly swing between state powers and federal powers.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   61                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. In his first term several of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal reforms were struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court as an overreach of federal powers. What was the response of President Roosevelt to these Court rulings?
a. The Roosevelt administration’s New Deal reforms were implemented anyway and the Supreme Court failed to enforce its ruling.
b. President Roosevelt devised a “court-packing plan” that would increase the number of justices and allow him to appoint them.
c. The Roosevelt administration complied with the Court’s federal authority based on the Supremacy Clause of Article VI.
d. The Roosevelt administration appealed the ruling to the international courts.
e. The Roosevelt administration took the cases into each of the state supreme courts.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   62                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. A positive aspect of cooperative federalism is
a. the expansion of central government.
b. grants-in-aid.
c. block grants.
d. individual states benefitting from large sums of funding.
e. All of the above are true.

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   62                  NOT:  factual

 

  1. “Layer Cake Federalism” is
a. a system in which the aims of subnational government are subordinate to the goals of the central government.
b. a system in which state and federal authority is intertwined in an inseparable mixture.
c. a system in which the authority of the state and federal governments is distinct and more easily delineated.
d. a system that affords Congress nearly unlimited authority to exercise its powers through means that often coerce states into administering and/or enforcing federal policies.
e. a system that holds that state authority acts as a significant limit on congressional power under the Constitution.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   62                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. “Marble Cake Federalism” is
a. a system in which the aims of subnational government are subordinated to the goals of the central government.
b. a system in which state and federal authority is intertwined in an inseparable mixture.
c. a system in which the authority of the state and federal governments is distinct and more easily delineated.
d. a system that affords Congress nearly unlimited authority to exercise its powers through means that often coerce states into administering and/or enforcing federal policies.
e. a system that holds that state authority acts as a significant limit on congressional power under the Constitution.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   62                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. When considering the history of the federal government’s powers over the states, what generally happens with the federal power during major economic depressions or world wars?
a. The powers of the federal government usually increase and state prerogatives decrease.
b. The federal government usually loses powers because it is perceived that it created the problem.
c. The federal government usually loses powers because of its inability to create solutions.
d. State powers increase because states are more able to generate consensus.
e. Federal powers increase because the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution creates a status similar to martial law during crises.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   62 | 63            NOT:  applied

 

  1. The era of cooperative federalism was rooted in the Great Depression struggles of the late 1930s. How did cooperative federalism differ from the previous era of dual federalism?
a. Cooperative federalism acted as a return to the strict doctrine of state powers.
b. Cooperative federalism increased the powers of the federal government when necessary, but retained basic state powers.
c. Cooperative federalism was an arrangement whereby the state governments were allowed to approve all Supreme Court rulings.
d. The Supreme Court had no authority under the dual federalism arrangement so the state governments cooperatively granted the Court its necessary powers.
e. State supreme courts continued to be the supreme authority in the national government structure.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   62–64            NOT:  applied

 

  1. The passage of the National Minimum Drinking Age Amendment is
a. an encouragement of the “laboratories of democracy.”
b. an example of lack of accountability.
c. an example of strengthening individual liberty through division of powers.
d. a disadvantage of federalism causing disparate programs for citizens of different states.
e. an example of a coercive burden on states that rely on federal funding.

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   63                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. Devolution is a term that is used to describe a system of federalism in which
a. state power is significantly weakening.
b. new states are being created.
c. the central government voluntarily transfers powers to the state and local governments.
d. the judicial branch assumes a dominant role in policymaking.
e. in which the powers of the president are considerably reduced.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   64                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. Over time, Presidents Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush appointed several justices to the Supreme Court who have created a new ideological majority. This new majority has tended to
a. staunchly guard the right of the national government to dictate policies that were traditionally held by the states.
b. strike a perfect balance between state and national government interest.
c. trample on the rights and prerogatives of state governments.
d. shift the Supreme Court to a stance much more favorable to states’ rights.
e. move the Supreme Court away from states’ rights.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   64                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. What effect did President Reagan have on the U.S. Supreme Court?
a. During the Reagan era, the Supreme Court invalidated many of the president’s policiesRemember, Reagan had little effect on the Supreme Court.
b. During his tenure, President Reagan had the opportunity to appoint four justices to the Supreme Court who were generally supportive of state powersRemember, the trend of devolution was strengthened in the judicial branch.
c. President Reagan appointed only one justice to the Supreme Court, an action that ultimately had little impact on the Court.
d. During his tenure, President Reagan was able to appoint several justices with liberal ideologies to the Supreme Court.
e. President Reagan arbitrated a stronger relationship between the Supreme Court and Congress whereby they worked cooperatively and in unison to implement policies.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   64                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. What is the significance of the “New Federalism” era, which began in the 1990s?
a. It has opened a new era of liberalism in our nation.
b. It has acted as a balance between conservatism and liberalism.
c. It has represented an era in which the U.S. Constitution was rewritten in favor of a more conservative governmental structure.
d. It appears that a significant counterthrust has occurred that has favored a return to states’ rights.
e. It has represented an era in which the Supreme Court clearly reiterated the power of the federal government over the states.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   64–66            NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. The uniform testing requirements imposed by the No Child Left Behind Act is a(n)
a. encouragement of the “laboratories of democracy.”
b. example of lack of accountability.
c. example of strengthening individual liberty through division of powers.
d. disadvantage of federalism causing disparate programs for citizens of different states.
e. None of the above is true.

 

 

ANS:  E                    REF:   65                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. What was the “Contract with America” in 1994?
a. It was a series of initiatives during the 1994 midterm elections that helped the Republican Party take control of both houses of Congress on a platform of devolution.
b. It was a rather liberal agenda that was adopted by President Clinton to offset the conservative trend that was gripping the nation.
c. It was a political campaign that was adopted by the Supreme Court to strengthen the citizens’ support of its rulings.
d. It was an attempt by the Republicans to consolidate all educational policies into one strong and effective federal Department of Education, as a remedy for a patchwork of state policies.
e. It was President Clinton’s political agenda to counter a surge in Republican support.

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   66                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. The existence of two distinct levels of government, combined with the separation of executive, legislative, and judicial powers within each of those governments, is a(n)
a. disadvantage of federalism.
b. example of accommodation of diversity.
c. example of strengthening of liberty through division of powers.
d. example of the operation of Brandeis’ “laboratories of democracy.”
e. All of the above are true.

 

 

ANS:  C                    REF:   67                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. Discouraging application of policies shown to be failures on a state level is a(n)
a. disadvantage of federalism.
b. example of accommodation of diversity.
c. example of strengthening of liberty through division of powers.
d. example of the operation of Brandeis’ “laboratories of democracy.”
e. All of the above are true.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   67                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. Which of the following is a disadvantage of federalism?
a. Strengthening of liberty through the division of powers
b. Accommodation of diversity
c. Encouragement of laboratories of democracy
d. Fiscal disparities among the states
e. None of the above is true.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   67                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. The culture of a state may be reflected in that state’s handgun control laws, its rules on the distribution of alcohol, or its laws concerning abortion, prostitution, the use of land, and many other issues that tend to receive differing levels of support across America. This reflects which kind of advantage or disadvantage to federalism?
a. Accommodation of diversity
b. Strengthening of liberty through division of powers
c. Lack of accountability
d. Encouragement of laboratories of democracy
e. Fiscal disparities among the states

 

 

ANS:  A                    REF:   67                  NOT:  conceptual

 

  1. The sharp differences in wealth of citizens in different states and consequent variation in taxable resources available for given states’ programs are a(n)
a. encouragement of the “laboratories of democracy.”
b. example of lack of accountability.
c. example of strengthening individual liberty through division of powers.
d. disadvantage of federalism causing disparate programs for citizens of different states.
e. example of reliance of courts to define the nature of federalism.

 

 

ANS:  D                    REF:   68                  NOT:  applied

 

  1. The practice of eliminating benefits and imposition of stricter requirements on those seeking welfare is a(n)
a. encouragement of the “laboratories of democracy.”
b. example of lack of accountability.
c. example of strengthening individual liberty through division of powers.
d. disadvantage of federalism causing disparate programs for citizens of different states.
e. example of reliance of courts to define the nature of federalism.

 

 

ANS:  B                    REF:   68 | 69            NOT:  applied

 

ESSAY

 

  1. The U.S. Constitution creates a dual system of government whereby powers are distributed between a federal government and the state governments. This arrangement has seen its share of challenges and changes. Discuss the major eras in American history as they relate to federalism, and describe which level of government appeared to be dominant at each time.

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. Compare the American system of federalism to other governmental structures such as a unitary government or a confederation. What are some of the strengths of federalism when compared with other government structures?

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. The presidency of Thomas Jefferson was significant regarding federalism. Discuss the Jefferson administration’s approach to the debate over states’ rights as well as his friction with the Federalists of his day.

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. What is meant by the term “New Federalism”? Discuss this era in comparison with earlier eras, especially regarding the roles of federal and state governments.

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. The U.S. Supreme Court plays a unique role in the American system of federalism. What was the Court’s role during the national supremacy period? How did its role change during the new federalism period? Overall, how has the Supreme Court been utilized over the years in the struggles over federalism?

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. What were the issues involved in McCulloch v. Maryland and Gibbons v. Ogden? What is the significance of these decisions for understanding the nature of American federalism? Compare and contrast these two cases.

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. Using contemporary examples, discuss the current state of federalism in the United States.

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. Compare and contrast the differences between “layer cake federalism” and “marble cake federalism.” Use examples to illustrate each form and explain the transition from one to the other.

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. Analyze the metaphor of Brandeis for creative federalism and the notion that single states may act as “laboratories of democracy.” Give examples of how state experiences have indicated to the federal government which policies to adopt and those policies not to adopt.

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

 

  1. Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of federalism. Do the advantages outweigh the disadvantages?

 

ANS:

Answers may vary.

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