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World History 7th Edition Duiker Spielvogel Test Bank

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World History 7th Edition Duiker Spielvogel Test Bank

SBN-13: 978-1111831653

ISBN-10: 1111831653

 

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World History 7th Edition Duiker Spielvogel Test Bank

SBN-13: 978-1111831653

ISBN-10: 1111831653

 

 

 

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Free Nursing Test Questions:

 

Chapter 13—The Byzantine Empire and Crisis and Recovery in the West

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Discuss both Justinian’s failures and his successes. What was the long-term impact of the Corpus Iuris Civilis? What was the role of the Empress Theodora in his reign? How was her influence particularly important in the Nika Rebellion?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. What were some of the issues that divided Orthodox Christianity from Roman Catholic Christianity? What were the long-term political implications of these differences?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the impact of the Crusades upon the Byzantine Empire. If the Crusader States had been placed under the authority of the Byzantine emperor, how might subsequent history have been different?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. The Western Roman Empire fell in the fifth century C.E., but the Eastern Roman Empire survived for many centuries. Why?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. How would European life in the fourteenth century have been different if the Black Plague had not come to Europe? Which individuals and groups might have been better off if it hadn’t occurred, and which groups might have been worse off? Why?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. What were the causes, effects, and most significant events of the Hundred Years’ War? Did the Hundred Years’ War differ in any manner from earlier medieval warfare? If so, how and why?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. “The Black Death and the Hundred Years’ War were more representative of the modern world than the medieval era.” Discuss critically.

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. What were the factors, internal and external, which affected the Church, and resulted in a decline of prestige and a loss of power by the beginning of the fifteenth century?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. What were the causes, nature, and results of the Italian Renaissance? Was it synonymous with humanism? Why or why not? How humane was the humanism of the time? Why?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Discuss the benefits of the Renaissance for women. In what ways do historians maintain that women had a greater degree of freedom in Renaissance Italy? In what ways was that freedom restrained? What role did Laura Cereta play? How was she prepared to take on this role?

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

  1. Was the Renaissance an evolutionary or a revolutionary event, or both? Discuss, using specific examples.

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. “The Renaissance was a direct consequence of the High Middle Ages.” Discuss, pro and con.

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1

 

IDENTIFICATIONS

 

Instructions: Identify the following terms.

 

  1. Justinian

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 358-359

 

  1. Theodora

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 358-359

 

  1. Nika Revolt

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 358

 

  1. Ostrogoths and Lombards

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 359

 

  1. Corpus Iuris Civilis

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 359

 

  1. Hagia Sophia

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 362

 

  1. Hippodrome

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 362

 

  1. theme

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. Greek fire

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. Bulgars

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. iconoclasm

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. “Byzantine”

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. Procopius

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 365

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Photian schism

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 367

 

  1. Macedonian dynasty

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 367

 

  1. 1054 schism

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 370

 

  1. Manzikert, 1071

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 370

 

  1. Latin Empire of Constantinople

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 371

 

  1. Michael Paleologus

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 371

 

  1. Ottoman Turks and 1453

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 372-374

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Mehmet II the Conqueror

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 372-374

 

  1. “little ice age”

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 374

 

  1. the Black Death and Yersinia pestis

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 374

 

  1. smallpox and the Americas

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 375

 

  1. flagellants and anti-Jewish pogroms

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 375-376

 

  1. peasant revolts

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 378

 

  1. Hundred Years’ War

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 378

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Crecy and Agincourt

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 378

 

  1. longbows

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 378

 

  1. Joan of Arc

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. gunpowder

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. Pope Boniface VIII

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. Philip IV

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. Avignon

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

 

 

 

 

  1. the Great Schism

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. Council of Constance, 1417

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. Renaissance

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 380-381

 

  1. l’uomo universale

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. Petrarch

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. humanism

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. Masaccio

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Leonardo da Vinci

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 382

 

  1. Raphael

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 382

 

  1. Michelangelo

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 382

 

  1. Cosimo de’ Medici

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 383-384

 

  1. Aragon and Castile

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

  1. War of the Roses

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

  1. Henry VII/Tudors

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. the Habsburgs

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

  1. Ivan III

 

ANS:

Answer not provided.

 

PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The most serious threat to Justinian’s rule came from the
a.Greens and the Blues.
b.crusaders.
c.Muslims.
d.Bulgars.
e.Ostrogoths.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 358

 

  1. Justinian’s most lasting accomplishment was
a.his victory over the Ostrogoths.
b.his defeat of the Muslim armies outside Constantinople.
c.the Corpus Iuris Civilis.
d.his victory over the Nika rioters.
e.the construction of Notre Dame.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 359

 

  1. Justinian’s greatest construction achievement was
a.the Hippodrome.
b.building the walls that surrounded and defended Constantinople.
c.the royal palace at the Golden Horn.
d.the Hagia Sophia.
e.the Grand Mosque of Istanbul.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 362

 

  1. In the seventh century, the greatest danger to the Byzantine Empire came from the
a.Slavs.
b.Muslims.
c.Persians.
d.Bulgars.
e.Ostrogoths.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

 

 

  1. The Byzantine theme
a.combined military and civil authority in one person.
b.was a military strategy relying upon Greek fire.
c.was the time, or the theme, during which the Eastern Roman Empire became known as the Byzantine Empire.
d.was a self-sufficient organization of peasants in Anatolia.
e.was the master plan for the rebuilding Constantinople under Justinian.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. Iconoclasm
a.created a division in the Roman Church but not the Orthodox Church.
b.required the worship of icons by Orthodox Christians.
c.outlawed the use of icons in the Byzantine Empire.
d.was imposed upon the East by Charlemagne.
e.was a political movement to restore the primacy of Latin in the Byzantine Empire.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. The best known Byzantine historian was
a.Einhard.
b.Tacitus.
c.Suetonious.
d.Belisarius.
e.Procopius.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 365

 

  1. The Photian schism
a.abolished the use of icons.
b.resulted in the excommunication of the Pope by the Patriarch.
c.led to the reunion of the Roman and Orthodox churches.
d.established the interdict in the Roman church.
e.divided Arabs from Persians, a split that continues to the present.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 367

 

  1. The dynasty that successfully restored Byzantine power in the ninth century was the
a.Anatolian.
b.Photian.
c.Bulgarian.
d.Justinian.
e.Macedonian.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 367

 

  1. The Orthodox Church had its greatest missionary success with the
a.Poles.
b.Czechs.
c.Russians.
d.Arabs.
e.Mongols.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 367

 

 

  1. In the eleventh century, the Byzantine emperor, Basil II, blinded fourteen thousand soldiers of the
a.Muslims.
b.Vikings.
c.Russians.
d.Bulgars.
e.Franks.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 368

 

  1. The major threat to the Byzantine Empire in the eleventh century came from the
a.Arabs.
b.Seljuk Turks.
c.Ottoman Turks.
d.Austrians.
e.Persians.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 370

 

  1. At the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, the
a.Seljuk Turks defeated the Byzantines.
b.Byzantines defeated the Normans.
c.Byzantines defeated the Seljuk Turks.
d.crusaders conquered Constantinople.
e.Ottoman Turks defeated the Byzantines.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 370

 

  1. The Italian city that benefited from the Fourth Crusade was
a.Rome.
b.Venice.
c.Florence.
d.Naples.
e.Genoa.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 371

 

  1. In the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade, the major state of the former Byzantine Empire was the
a.Latin Empire of Constantinople.
b.Venetian Kingdom of Constantinople.
c.Greek Empire of Constantinople.
d.Ottoman Turk Empire of Istanbul.
e.Latin Kingdom of Anatolia.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 371

 

  1. In 1453, the Byzantine Empire fell to the
a.Arabs.
b.Seljuk Turks.
c.Ottoman Turks.
d.Bulgars and Ukranians.
e.the crusaders.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 372-374

 

 

 

  1. A major advantage that the Ottomans had against Constantinople in 1453 was
a.cavalry.
b.the longbow.
c.the crossbow.
d.Greek fire.
e.cannons.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 373

 

  1. The early fourteenth century was troubled by
a.the “little ice age.”
b.a medieval greenhouse effect.
c.a rapid population increase.
d.the capture of Rome by Muslim armies.
e.the fall of Constantinople at the hands of the Seljuk Turks.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 374

 

  1. The Mongols
a.facilitated the spread of the plague with the creation of its Silk Road empire.
b.stopped the spread of the plague to China, but allowed it to decimate the West.
c.stopped the spread of the plague to the West, but allowed it to decimate China.
d.were immune from the Yersinia pestis.
e.captured Constantinople.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 374

 

  1. The Black Death
a.was spread by fleas carrying Yersinia pestis.
b.killed ninety-five percent of its victims in urban areas.
c.had been an ongoing problem in Europe since the late Roman Empire.
d.killed many people, but had no effect on economic affairs.
e.had no religious implications.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 374

 

  1. Flagellants
a.was the term used to describe the aristocratic opponents of rebelling serfs.
b.were Jews who beat themselves in an effort to avoid harsher abuse by Christians.
c.were a new order of friars which were established in France by Joan of Arc.
d.were Christian fanatics who physically scourged themselves during the Black Death.
e.were hereditary slaves in fifteenth-century Italy.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 375

 

  1. As a result of the Black Death,
a.there was a decrease in anti-Semitism.
b.there was an increase in anti-Semitism.
c.flagellation disappeared.
d.the population rose in Italian cities but fell in English and French cities and towns.
e.the Pope moved to Avignon.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 376

 

 

 

  1. As a result of the Black Death,
a.peasants were worse off.
b.social unrest increased.
c.social unrest decreased.
d.the Roman Church gained power and authority.
e.citizen-ruled republics replaced divine-right monarchies in much of Europe.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 376-378

 

  1. At the beginning of the Hundred Years’ War, the English had the advantage because of
a.cannon and gunpowder.
b.the crossbow.
c.the longbow.
d.heavily armored cavalry.
e.German mercenaries.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 378

 

  1. By the end of the Hundred Years’ War, the French gained victory because of
a.cannon and gunpowder.
b.the crossbow.
c.the longbow.
d.heavily armored cavalry.
e.German mercenaries.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. All of the following regarding the Hundred Years’ War are correct except
a.traditional nobles fighting on horseback were the keys to victory.
b.new weapons were used in the war, including the longbow and gunpowder.
c.the English were victorious at the battles of Crécy and Agincourt.
d.Joan of Arc was burnt at the stake.
e.it was fought between England and France.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 378-379

 

  1. Political disintegration in the fourteenth century resulted from all of the following except
a.financial problems.
b.use of mercenary soldiers.
c.the breakdown of feudalism.
d.dynasties had too many male heirs.
e.dynasties were unable to produce male heirs.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. The papacy of Boniface VIII saw
a.the Roman Church supreme over all of Christendom.
b.Boniface forced to flee in the face of a French takeover.
c.Boniface successfully excommunicating and destroying the power of France’s Philip.IV.
d.the papacy moving to Germany after Boniface’s death.
e.the Church weakened as a result of the Black Death.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

 

 

  1. In the early fourteenth century, the Catholic church
a.financed the construction of the new cathedral of St. Peter’s in Rome.
b.supported the First Crusade at the Council of Clermont.
c.was forced to move the pope’s residence to Avignon.
d.was placed under the rule of the Holy Roman Emperors.
e.banned the use of the inquisition.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. The Great Schism
a.resulted in the capture of Jerusalem by Saladin.
b.saw two different individuals claiming to be the true pope.
c.was the result of the investiture controversy between Gregory VII and Henry IV.
d.led to the Hundred Years’ War between England and France.
e.led to the sacking of Constantinople by crusaders from the West.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. The council that ended the Great Schism was the council of
a.Clermont.
b.Canossa.
c.Orleans.
d.Constance.
e.Trent.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. The Renaissance began in
a.Byzantium.
b.France.
c.Italy.
d.Spain.
e.Flanders.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 380

 

  1. The phrase l’uomo universale means that one should
a.be capable of achievements in many areas.
b.reject religion and become a student of the universe.
c.specialize in great depth in a single subject, such as history or physics.
d.turn to God as the only answer to the problems of this world.
e.reject public service and satisfy one’s personal ambitions.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. This Renaissance woman defended the right of women to pursue scholarly pursuits.
a.Cassandra Fedele
b.Francesca Civolia
c.Dona Medici
d.Isotta Nogarola
e.Laura Cerata

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381 | p. 382

 

 

 

  1. An Italian intellectual who hunted down ancient manuscripts and emphasized classical Latin was
a.Sforza.
b.Bruni.
c.Petrarch.
d.Chrysoloras.
e.Ficino.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. The ideal of early fifteenth-century Humanists was to
a.reject religion and the Church.
b.serve the state.
c.abandon history and the past.
d.work only for the most powerful states.
e.establish political democracies throughout Europe.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. The principles of Early Renaissance art
a.were demonstrated in the frescoes of Masaccio, which employed the laws of perspective and a more realistic relationship between figures and landscape.
b.excluded the nudes in the works of Palladio.
c.failed to begin a new area of artistic statement.
d.were marked by total disregard of knowledge of motion and/or anatomical detail.
e.explored the possibilities of scroll portraiture.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. Renaissance artists
a.painted and sculpted only religious subjects.
b.never painted or sculpted religious subjects.
c.focused on a realistic portrayal of human beings and nature.
d.turned their back on nature, following instead their inner subjective emotions.
e.never worked for the Church.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. The architect Filippo Brunelleschi was inspired by
a.Greek models.
b.Roman models.
c.Byzantine models.
d.Chinese models.
e.Roman Catholic Church models.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. The divine beauty of the ceiling figures in the Sistine Chapel are a reflection of the Neoplatonism of
a.Leonardo.
b.Raphael.
c.Michelangelo.
d.Van Eyck.
e.Dürer.

 

 

ANS:  C                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 382

 

 

  1. The artist who painted the Sistine Chapel and who sculpted the statue of David was
a.Leonardo da Vinci.
b.Michelangelo.
c.Masaccio.
d.Raphael.
e.Alberti.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 382-383

 

  1. The painter who was famous for his madonnas was
a.Leonardo da Vinci.
b.Michelangelo.
c.Masaccio.
d.Raphael.
e.Alberti.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 382

 

  1. The Renaissance artist who moved away from realistic portrayals to idealized forms was
a.Leonardo da Vinci.
b.Michelangelo.
c.Masaccio.
d.Raphael.
e.Alberti.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 382

 

  1. Which area failed to establish a centralized territorial state by the end of the fifteenth century?
a.France
b.Italy
c.Spain
d.England
e.None managed to establish a centralized state.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 383

 

  1. Italian city states such as Venice and Florence could best be described as
a.rural democracies.
b.urban democracies.
c.legitimate autocracies.
d.merchant oligarchies.
e.royal oligarchies.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 383

 

  1. France’s Louis XI was known as the
a.Frog.
b.Bear.
c.Octopus.
d.Tiger.
e.Spider.

 

 

ANS:  E                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

 

 

  1. The English king most responsible for creating a strong monarchical government was
a.Henry VI.
b.Edward V.
c.Richard III.
d.Henry VII.
e.Henry VIII.

 

 

ANS:  D                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

  1. All of the following are correct about the Holy Roman Empire in the fifteenth century except
a.it was a strong centralized territorial state.
b.it consisted of hundreds of largely independent states.
c.the position of Holy Roman Emperor was held by the Habsburgs.
d.it was made up primarily of German-speaking peoples.
e.Habsburg power rested upon their control of vast agricultural estates.

 

 

ANS:  A                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

  1. All of the following were true of the political recovery of the fifteenth century in Europe except
a.centralized monarchies gained strength in western Europe.
b.centralized monarchies gained strength in Germanic central Europe.
c.decentralized government became typical in eastern and central Europe.
d.the “new monarchies” greatly aided in stabilizing France, Spain, and England.
e.Henry VII’s cautious policies had made England solvent and stable by 1500.

 

 

ANS:  B                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 384

 

TRUE/FALSE

 

  1. Justinian’s most significant accomplishment was in permanently reuniting the old Roman Empire.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 359

 

  1. In the Byzantine Empire, Latin remained the major language as the use of Greek was narrowly restricted to monasteries.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 363

 

  1. England won the Hundred Years’ War because of the English reliance on the longbow.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 379

 

  1. The appearance of the violent and destructive Mongol Empire ended all trade between the West and China.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 374

 

  1. Rome was the largest city in Europe in the Middle Ages.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 365

 

 

 

  1. In 1054, the leaders of the Roman Catholic Church and the Orthodox Church excommunicated each other, leading to a split in Christendom which continues to the present.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 370

 

  1. As a result of the Fourth Crusade, the West established a permanent political presence in the Byzantine Empire.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 371

 

  1. Because of the lack of sanitation, the mortality rate of the Black Death was considerably higher in rural areas than in urban areas.

 

ANS:  F                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 374-375

 

  1. The l’uomo universale was the ideal of the Renaissance, and was a person who was capable of achievements in many areas of life.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 381

 

  1. The Renaissance was largely an urban phenomenon.

 

ANS:  T                    PTS:   1                    REF:   p. 380